Action Items


How were the Calls to Action identified?

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission identified 94 Calls to Action in its final report in 2015. Thirty-one of those Calls fall under the jurisdiction of the provincial government with some overlap with other government organizations – federal, municipal, territorial and Indigenous.

The federal government says: “Between 2007 and 2015, the Government of Canada provided about $72 million to support the TRC's work. The TRC spent 6 years travelling to all parts of Canada and heard from more than 6,500 witnesses. The TRC also hosted 7 national events across Canada to engage the Canadian public, educate people about the history and legacy of the residential schools system, and share and honour the experiences of former students and their families.”

That 2015 report called on all levels of government, in addition to organizations and residents of Canada in general, to take action to mend the legacy of the residential schools and advance the process of reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada.

 


List of Actions in New Brunswick jurisdiction

  


Child Welfare

1. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to commit to reducing the number of Aboriginal children in care by:

i.       Monitoring and assessing neglect investigations.

ii.      Providing adequate resources to enable Aboriginal communities and child-welfare organizations to keep Aboriginal families together where it is safe to do so, and to keep children in culturally appropriate environments, regardless of where they reside.

iii.    Ensuring that social workers and others who conduct child-welfare investigations are properly educated and trained about the history and impacts of residential schools.

iv.    Ensuring that social workers and others who conduct child-welfare investigations are properly educated and trained about the potential for Aboriginal communities and families to provide more appropriate solutions to family healing.

v. Requiring that all child-welfare decision makers consider the impact of the residential   school experience on children and their caregivers.

What's Happening

1. Social Development continues to train its child welfare staff on the recent federal legislation: An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, along with the province’s role and responsibility in reducing the number of Indigenous children in care.

The department continues to support family/kinship as the first option for children/youth.

The department has also introduced Professional Care Homes to provide full-time care to children with complex needs who are under the care of the Department of Social Development. The development of professional care homes aims to fill gaps that have been identified and strengthen child well-being. In a professional care home, children live with a family that has the knowledge and experience to understand the child’s complex needs. The family home is culturally appropriate for the child and clinical, traditional and community supports are an integral part of meeting the child’s complex needs.

The provincial government has also introduced new stand-alone child welfare legislation that recognizes the importance of the child or youth’s connection to their family, culture, language, religion, faith or spiritual beliefs and community, especially for Indigenous children and youth.


2. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with the provinces and territories, to prepare and publish annual reports on the number of Aboriginal children (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) who are in care, compared with non-Aboriginal children, as well as the reasons for apprehension, the total spending on preventive and care services by child-welfare agencies, and the effectiveness of various interventions.

What's Happening

2. The Department of Social Development continues to participate in a Federal/Provincial-Territorial forum that works bilaterally and trilaterally on data strategy efforts to realize proper and standardized reporting involving Indigenous children in care.


3. We call upon all levels of government to fully implement Jordan’s Principle.

What's Happening


3. The Province provides a list of services being offered throughout New Brunswick, which assists the Jordan’s Principle coordinators. New Brunswick has been an active partner for more than a decade.


5. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to develop culturally appropriate parenting programs for Aboriginal families.

 

What's Happening

5. In the francophone education sector, there is an online module for diversity for early learning and child care educators and intervenors in which history, culture and language in respect of First Nations are included.

In the anglophone education sector, the L’Nu Tell Me a Story program was expanded in the Anglophone North School District whereby both children and their families have opportunities to learn more about Indigenous culture.


Education

12. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to develop culturally appropriate early childhood education programs for Aboriginal families.

What's Happening



12. The First Nations communities and the school districts develop strategic plans for students living in a First Nations community and attending public schools. Objectives of these plans include reducing the academic achievement gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and providing a quality educational experience that is relevant and recognizes cultural background.

In the Anglophone sector, the Mi’gmaq and Wolastoqey language curriculum levels 1 and 2 online versions have been completed to support access in smaller communities. Treaty education development partners inform the development of culturally appropriate curricula and resources regarding treaty education, residential schools, culture and history.

GNB continues to build partnerships with First Nations community schools to provide a venue for on-going collaboration and a successful school experience for students transitioning to provincial schools, and to engage, inform and support First Nations community schools in the areas of provincial curriculum, assessment, professional learning, education support services, and early childhood education.

Supporting documents for the NB Early Learning and Child Care Curriculum Framework (English) have been developed and include culturally appropriate documentation developed in collaboration with First Nations programs. At the request of First Nations communities, the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development works collaboratively with First Nations communities to share best practices to best support children and families.

Education Support Services has provided any documentation (with videos) to First Nations families in their mother-tongue. They are also working on having their Essential Skills program in the 13 most common languages spoken in New Brunswick as well as the Mi’gmaq and Wolastoqey languages.

In the Francophone sector, there is an online module for diversity for early learning and child care educators and intervenors in which history, culture and language in respect of First Nations are included. Resources such as childrens books are also listed for educators and intervenors to have access.

In the Anglophone sector, the L’Nu Tell Me a Story program was initiated to honour and commemorate Indigenous culture. Through working in collaboration with an Indigenous Elder, educators, children and their families learn about music, songs, food and items of cultural significance to the Wabanaki people.


Language and Culture

17. We call upon all levels of government to enable residential school Survivors and their families to reclaim names changed by the residential school system by waiving administrative costs for a period of five years for the name-change process and the revision of official identity documents, such as birth certificates, passports, driver’s licenses, health cards, status cards, and social insurance numbers.

What's Happening



17. Service New Brunswick is ready to process legal change of name requests and will waive the fees. This can be done under the current legislation and registry system.


Health

18. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to acknowledge that the current state of Aboriginal health in Canada is a direct result of previous Canadian government policies, including residential schools, and to recognize and implement the health-care rights of Aboriginal people as identified in international law, constitutional law, and under the Treaties.

What's Happening



18. Certain First Nations communities have regular access to different health professionals, such as a psychologist, social worker, physician, pediatrician, audiologist, and nurse, as well as mental health services.

Regional Health Authorities have been providing some psychologist, social worker, and community-based mental health and addiction services to First Nations communities, whether they live in the community or outside of it.


22. We call upon those who can effect change within the Canadian health-care system to recognize the value of Aboriginal healing practices and use them in the treatment of Aboriginal patients in collaboration with Aboriginal healers and Elders where requested by Aboriginal patients.

What's Happening



22. New Brunswick Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Centre of Excellence developed and launched a unique model called “Dreamcatcher” to ensure a culturally appropriate delivery of services to First Nations clients and families.

Vitalité Health Network hired a First Nations Regional Access Coordinator to oversee the coordination and effectiveness of steps taken to improve access to mental health and addiction services as well as primary care for First Nations. Vitalité Health Network is engaged in an ongoing and dynamic Community Health Needs Assessment process to identify community strengths and gaps, to guide the identification of priorities that will allow the community to improve the health status of the population.

Horizon Health Network hired an Indigenous Relations Coordinator to implement the Indigenous Strategic Framework, to increase cultural safety through employee training and other initiatives and to incorporate traditional healing practices and knowledge into care.

Smudging ceremonies are available across Horizon when requested. Work is also underway to allow smokeless options for patients who are unable to transfer to a designated smudging space in hospitals. Sacred medicines (sage, cedar and sweetgrass) are available for patient use in eight out of 11 hospitals with plans to expand this to other facilities.

Horizon Health Network has begun regional work to improve discharge planning and communication between Horizon hospitals and First Nations health centres.


23. We call upon all levels of government to:

i.       Increase the number of Aboriginal professionals working in the health-care field.

ii.      Ensure the retention of Aboriginal health-care providers in Aboriginal communities.

Provide cultural competency training for all health- care professionals.

 

What's Happening



23. Health authorities are taking steps to educate their employees on residential and day schools and to increase employees’ cultural competencies. Fox example, a project called "Braiding First Nations' Culture" is intended to enhance the cultural competencies of Vitalité’s employees and builds ties with First Nations communities across the province. A learning plan has been developed allowing network employees to acquire skills, knowledge and openness toward improving cultural competencies.

Justice 25-42

26. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to review and amend their respective statutes of limitations to ensure that they conform to the principle that governments and other entities cannot rely on limitation defences to defend legal actions of historical abuse brought by Aboriginal people.

What's Happening



26. Information on activities related to this Call to Action has not yet been reported.

 


30. We call upon federal, provincial, and territorial governments to commit to eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in custody over the next decade, and to issue detailed annual reports that monitor and evaluate progress in doing so.

What's Happening



30. GNB has a working group regarding Indigenous programs and policy, in order to address gaps and areas of concern (such as overrepresentation).

GNB provides a Probation Officer and Victim Services Coordinator to support the Elsipogtog Healing to Wellness Court. The court incorporates Indigenous practices and culture in addressing the root causes of crime, such as mental health and addictions. Eligible participants take responsibility for their actions and comply with a treatment program as ordered by the court. The Department of Justice and Public Safety provided a letter of support for the John Howard Society’s Intercultural Youth Initiative, an evidence-based program that aims to address risk factors to offending among at-risk youth through culturally aware and proactive supports like mentoring, experiential learning, social engagement, and personal skills development. The program will help empower youth to build on competencies and life skills to prevent problematic behaviours such as substance abuse, bullying, violence, and poor school attendance. The program is available to Indigenous youth served by the department and enrolment costs are covered by Justice and Public Safety.

The Changing Directions model for chronic repeat offenders (pilot began in 2018 includes a large component of Indigenous community engagement and the development/contracting of culturally appropriate intervention for clients. The program is now operational in four regions: Saint John/St. Stephen, Fredericton, Moncton and Miramichi.

Under the First Nation Policing Program, New Brunswick has Community Program Officers who provide a non-uniformed, alternative service delivery method by civilian members to implement programs that focus on prevention and reduction of crime through education, intervention and sustainable community engagement.

A new Pre-Sentence Report (PSR) template is now used for both youth and adults which speaks directly to addressing Gladue factors which are critical in the appropriate sentencing of Indigenous people. It includes a community narrative and a healing plan that is intended to bring a culturally specific element to rehabilitation.

Restorative justice is an option that is designed to connect clients who identify as Indigenous to Indigenous communities. Correctional staff, Probation Officers, and Victim Service Coordinators receive Indigenous cultural and traditional awareness training; further work is underway to increase training of front-line staff, policy advisors and decision makers. Awakening Cultural Identity and Spirituality (ACIS) is a program for adult provincial offenders. In partnership with the John Howard Society of New Brunswick, ACIS provides an Indigenous Liaison service across the province, linking traditional Elders with offenders requesting culturally distinct services for effective reintegration.

Crown prosecutors or police may refer an individual to an alternative measures program where they feel alternative measures are sufficient to hold a person accountable for the offence committed without undermining the administration of justice or public confidence in the criminal justice system.

The department of Justice and Public Safety has been engaged with First Nations and Justice Canada concerning funding to establish an Indigenous Court Worker program in New Brunswick.

 


31. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide sufficient and stable funding to implement and evaluate community sanctions that will provide realistic alternatives to imprisonment for Aboriginal offenders and respond to the underlying causes of offending.

What's Happening



31. Restorative justice is an option that is designed to connect clients who identify as Indigenous to Indigenous communities.

GNB provides a Probation Officer and Victim Services Coordinator to support the Elsipogtog Healing to Wellness Court. The court incorporates Indigenous practices and culture in addressing the root causes of crime, such as mental health and addictions. Eligible participants take responsibility for their actions and comply with a treatment program as ordered by the court.

The Department of Justice and Public Safety provided a letter of support for the John Howard Society’s Intercultural Youth Initiative, an evidence-based program that aims to address risk factors to offending among at-risk youth through culturally aware and proactive supports like mentoring, experiential learning, social engagement, and personal skills development. The program will help empower youth to build on competencies and life skills to prevent problematic behaviours such as substance abuse, bullying, violence, and poor school attendance. The program is available to Indigenous youth served by the department and enrolment costs are covered by Justice and Public Safety.

The Changing Directions model for chronic repeat offenders (pilot began in 2018)includes a large component of Indigenous community engagement and the development/contracting of culturally appropriate intervention for clients. The program is now operational in four regions: Saint John/St. Stephen, Fredericton, Moncton and Miramichi.

Awakening Cultural Identity and Spirituality (ACIS) is a program for adult provincial offenders. In partnership with the John Howard Society of New Brunswick, ACIS provides an Indigenous liaison service across the province, linking traditional Elders with offenders requesting culturally distinct services for effective reintegration.

 


33. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to recognize as a high priority the need to address and prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to develop, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, FASD preventive programs that can be delivered in a culturally appropriate manner.

What's Happening



33. GNB is establishing a working group to identify options to improve Indigenous-focused mental health services in correctional institutions. GNB recognizes that programs and services will need to consider specific health needs such as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and the distinct cultural, spiritual and community needs of Indigenous offenders in custody.

 


34. We call upon the governments of Canada, the provinces, and territories to undertake reforms to the criminal justice system to better address the needs of offenders with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), including:

i.       Providing increased community resources and powers for courts to ensure that FASD is properly diagnosed, and that appropriate community supports are in place for those with FASD.

ii.      Enacting statutory exemptions from mandatory minimum sentences of imprisonment for offenders affected by FASD.

iii.    Providing community, correctional, and parole resources to maximize the ability of people with FASD to live in the community.

Adopting appropriate evaluation mechanisms to measure the effectiveness of such programs and ensure community safety.

What's Happening



34. GNB is establishing a working group to identify options to improve Indigenous-focused mental health services in correctional institutions. GNB recognizes that programs and services will need to consider specific health needs such as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and the distinct cultural, spiritual and community needs of Indigenous offenders in custody.

 


36. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to work with Aboriginal communities to provide culturally relevant services to inmates on issues such as substance abuse, family and domestic violence, and overcoming the experience of having been sexually abused.

What's Happening



36. Correctional Services has cultural, traditional faith-based programs and resources that are made accessible to Indigenous offenders within provincial institutions with access to Elder volunteers in an attempt to maintain or link the offender to community-based support upon release.

The Indigenous Pathways Project is designed to gauge current demography for Indigenous offenders within provincial institutions and identify gaps in holistic program service delivery.

Awakening Cultural Identity and Spirituality (ACIS) is a program for adult provincial offenders. In partnership with the John Howard Society of New Brunswick, ACIS provides an Indigenous liaison service across the province, linking traditional Elders with offenders requesting culturally distinct services for effective reintegration.

 


38. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to commit to eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal youth in custody over the next decade.

What's Happening



38. Restorative justice is an option that is designed to connect clients that identify as Indigenous to Indigenous communities.

 


40. We call on all levels of government, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, to create adequately funded and accessible Aboriginal-specific victim programs and services with appropriate evaluation mechanisms.

What's Happening



40. The New Brunswick Plan to Prevent and Respond to Violence Against Aboriginal Women and Girls was released in 2017. GNB will continue to work with and engage Indigenous women through the New Brunswick Advisory Committee on Violence Against Aboriginal Women, community partners, and families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, with regards to the final recommendations from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

The Family Information Liaison Officer is a dedicated liaison between families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and other provincial agencies and services, including the criminal justice system, social services, and policing in New Brunswick.

The Aboriginal Domestic Violence Outreach Program supports Indigenous women living in or outside of a First Nation community. The Outreach Worker helps to improve Indigenous women’s access to services, provides help and information to Indigenous women in need, and increases awareness on intimate partner violence in the community.

A Coordinated Community Response pilot provides additional support for high risk and high danger cases of intimate partner violence. Teams include representation from Indigenous organizations (i.e. Gignoo Transition House).

Gignoo Transition House, a not-for-profit women’s shelter in Fredericton for Indigenous women and children experiencing domestic violence, is funded by the provincial and federal governments.

The Love Shouldn’t Hurt Campaign materials include a focus on Indigenous women with information and material translated into Wolastoqey and Mi’gmaq. The campaign has partnered with Indigenous groups to provide awareness and promote the campaign to Indigenous populations and communities.

The Victim Services Program has partnered with Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick (PLEIS-NB) to develop a directory of services for victims of abuse living in First Nation communities.

 


42. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to commit to the recognition and implementation of Aboriginal justice systems in a manner consistent with the Treaty and Aboriginal rights of Aboriginal peoples, the Constitution Act, 1982, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, endorsed by Canada in November 2012.

What's Happening



42. GNB provides a Probation Officer and Victim Services Coordinator to support the Elsipogtog Healing to Wellness Court. The court incorporates Indigenous practices and culture in addressing the root causes of crime, such as mental health and addictions. Eligible participants take responsibility for their actions and comply with a treatment program as ordered by the court.

Under the First Nation Policing Program, New Brunswick has Community Program Officers who provide a non-uniformed, alternative service delivery method by civilian members to implement programs that focus on prevention and reduction of crime through education, intervention and sustainable community engagement.

 


Canadian Government and UNDRIP

43. We call upon federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.

What's Happening



43. GNB is undertaking a technical compliance review of its programs, policies and legislation to determine the extent to which they comply with the principles articulated in the Declaration.

 


Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation

47. We call upon federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to repudiate concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous peoples and lands, such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius, and to reform those laws, government policies, and litigation strategies that continue to rely on such concepts.

What's Happening



47. Information on activities related to this Call to Action has not yet been reported.

 


Equity for Aboriginal People in the Legal System

52. We call upon the Government of Canada, provincial and territorial governments, and the courts to adopt the following legal principles:

i.       Aboriginal title claims are accepted once the Aboriginal claimant has established occupation over a particular territory at a particular point in time.

Once Aboriginal title has been established, the burden of proving any limitation on any rights arising from the existence of that title shifts to the party asserting such a limitation.

What's Happening



52. GNB has considered this Call to Action and the legal principles established by the Supreme Court of Canada in various cases related to Aboriginal title.

 


National Council for Reconciliation

55. We call upon all levels of government to provide annual reports or any current data requested by the National Council for Reconciliation so that it can report on the progress towards reconciliation. The reports or data would include, but not be limited to:

i.       The number of Aboriginal children—including Métis and Inuit children—in care, compared with non- Aboriginal children, the reasons for apprehension, and the total spending on preventive and care services by child-welfare agencies.

ii.      Comparative funding for the education of First Nations children on and off reserves.

iii.    The educational and income attainments of Aboriginal peoples in Canada compared with non- Aboriginal people.

iv.    Progress on closing the gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in a number of health indicators such as: infant mortality, maternal health, suicide, mental health, addictions, life expectancy, birth rates, infant and child health issues, chronic diseases, illness and injury incidence, and the availability of appropriate health services.

v.     Progress on eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal children in youth custody over the next decade. 

vi.    Progress on reducing the rate of criminal victimization of Aboriginal people, including data related to homicide and family violence victimization and other crimes.

vii. Progress on reducing the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in the justice and correctional systems.

What's Happening



55. A National Council for Reconciliation has not yet been established. However, the Province would be in a position to provide data for 55.ii. (comparative funding for the education of First Nations children on and off reserves) and 55.iii (the educational and income attainments of Aboriginal peoples in Canada compared with non-Aboriginal people).

 


Professional Development and Training for Public Servants

57. We call upon federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to provide education to public servants on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations.  This will require skills- based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

What's Happening



57. Correctional staff, Probation Officers and Victim Service Coordinators receive Indigenous cultural awareness training; further work is underway to increase training of front-line staff, policy advisors and decision makers in the Department of Justice and Public Safety.

Health authorities are taking steps to educate their employees on residential schools and to increase employees’ cultural competencies.

Ongoing professional learning opportunities on Indigenous histories, traditions and current realities have been provided to all school personnel. The cultural competency professional development aims to ensure all teachers understand the Indigenous students in their classrooms.

Social workers, supervisors, managers, and foster parents who work with children in care receive cultural competency training.

The Department of Aboriginal Affairs (DAA) is coordinating the provision of cultural awareness training opportunities for all public servants. This will include the development of training modules on topics such as the history of Indigenous peoples in New Brunswick and residential and day schools.

In the spring of 2022, the Premier and other elected officials participated in a Blanket Exercise, which is an interactive experience that builds understanding about the shared history of Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. Participants are actively involved as they step onto blankets that represent the land, and into the role of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.

A Blanket Exercise was also held for employees from DAA, the Department of Justice and Public Safety, and --. In addition, employees with DAA and the Department of Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour have participated in training sessions provided by Indigenous organizations such as the Joint Economic Development Initiative and Mi’gmawe’l Tplu’taqnn.

 


Education for Reconciliation

62. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments, in consultation and collaboration with Survivors, Aboriginal peoples, and educators, to:

i.       Make age-appropriate curriculum on residential schools, Treaties, and Aboriginal peoples’ historical and contemporary contributions to Canada a mandatory education requirement for Kindergarten to Grade Twelve students.

ii.      Provide the necessary funding to post-secondary institutions to educate teachers on how to integrate Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods into classrooms.

iii.    Provide the necessary funding to Aboriginal schools to utilize Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods in classrooms.

iv. Establish senior-level positions in government at the assistant deputy minister level or higher dedicated to Aboriginal content in education.

What's Happening



62. Topics such as the history of Indian Residential and Indian Day Schools, treaties and historical legislation, federal funding, land claims, language and culture and current issues facing First Nations in New Brunswick are being included in learning modules for students from kindergarten to grade 12.

Professional learning opportunities on Indigenous histories, traditions and current realities have been provided to all school personnel.

Beginning this year, curriculum development in the anglophone sector is now guided by the Wabanaki Holistic Education Framework which was developed by the EECD Council of Elders and was reviewed by representatives from Indigenous communities and educators from across the province. This framework will improve the quality and quantity of Wabanaki content across all subject areas. Wabanaki perspectives, cultures, histories and the treaty relationship are central to this work and oversight is continuously provided by Elders.

In honour of the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation (Sept. 30), numerous initiatives were undertaken throughout the education system. These activities included students creating and wearing orange shirts in honour of survivors of Indian Residential Schools; receiving teachings from Elders; lowering flags in front of school buildings; the creation of lesson plans and multi-media resources; professional learning delivered for teachers; and guided readings for students on Indian Residential Schools. In the anglophone sector, this also includes fundraising for First Nation service organizations; partnering with the Gord Downie and Chanie Wenjack foundation; hosting Blanket Exercises; and sponsoring the Reconciliation Week activities that were delivered through the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

The GNB Access and Success Program provides support for key institution-led efforts, including, for example, UNB's Truth and Reconciliation Committee, UNB’s position of Piluwitahasuwin (Assistant Vice President Indigenous Engagement), the development of cultural understanding at New Brunswick Community College on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, residential schools, and Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Further contributing to the effort to inform both educators and the public, the New Brunswick Public Library Service has added a dedicated Indigenous Services Librarian position, and built a strong collection of materials on Indigenous topics, including: residential schools; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Indigenous languages.

Libraries are engaged in promoting awareness of these materials to the public by promoting national programs such as First Nations Communities Reads. The New Brunswick Public Library Services has developed a Strategic Plan for Indigenous Library Services 2019-2022. The plan focuses on libraries building local connections with First Nations to guide local programming initiatives to promote Indigenous cultures, languages and histories.

The FutureWabanaki program provides funding under an Incentive Fund component to further engage faculty and staff to offer and create co-curriculum experiential learning opportunities within a course/program specific to enhancing Indigenous knowledge and cultural teachings to Indigenous students.

 


64. We call upon all levels of government that provide public funds to denominational schools to require such schools to provide an education on comparative religious studies, which must include a segment on Aboriginal spiritual beliefs and practices developed in collaboration with Aboriginal Elders.

What's Happening



64. N/A

 


Missing Children and Burial Information

71. We call upon all chief coroners and provincial vital statistics agencies that have not provided to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada their records on the deaths of Aboriginal children in the care of residential school authorities to make these documents available to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

What's Happening



71. All relevant records have been provided to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

 


75. We call upon the federal government to work with provincial, territorial, and municipal governments, churches, Aboriginal communities, former residential school students, and current landowners to develop and implement strategies and procedures for the ongoing identification, documentation, maintenance, commemoration, and protection of residential school cemeteries or other sites at which residential school children were buried. This is to include the provision of appropriate memorial ceremonies and commemorative markers to honour the deceased children.

What's Happening



75. All relevant records have been provided to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

 


National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation

77. We call upon provincial, territorial, municipal, and community archives to work collaboratively with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation to identify and collect copies of all records relevant to the history and legacy of the residential school system, and to provide these to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

What's Happening



77. All relevant records have been provided to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

 


Commemoration

82. We call upon provincial and territorial governments, in collaboration with Survivors and their organizations, and other parties to the Settlement Agreement, to commission and install a publicly accessible, highly visible, Residential Schools Monument in each capital city to honour Survivors and all the children who were lost to their families and communities.

What's Happening



82. The Department of Aboriginal Affairs has reached out to Indigenous communities and requested the identification of representatives who can work with the department to implement this Call to Action.

 


Sports and Reconciliation

87. We call upon all levels of government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, sports halls of fame, and other relevant organizations, to provide public education that tells the national story of Aboriginal athletes in history.

What's Happening



87. GNB provides annual funding to the New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame to support the Sport Ambassador Program. This includes the identification and training of Indigenous sport leaders who make regular presentations to schools and communities across the province, including First Nations schools and communities.

 


88. We call upon all levels of government to take action to ensure long-term Aboriginal athlete development and growth, and continued support for the North American Indigenous Games, including funding to host the games and for provincial and territorial team preparation and travel.

What's Happening



88. The Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture (THC) provides annual funding and works in close partnership with Aboriginal Sport and Recreation NB and other partners such as Coach NB and Sport NB to support the development of Indigenous athletes and coaches in the province. Funding also supports the provincial Indian Summer Games, Team NB preparation for the North American Indigenous Games, and annual recognition events and awards for Indigenous sport leaders.

GNB supports provincial and community projects that strengthen physical literacy and increases sport participation through the GO NB Bilateral Agreement and THC’s regional offices. THC provides expertise and resources to help promote the Aboriginal Long-Term Development Model.