Phase 2 on the path to Green allows restrictions for travellers from Maine and other international jurisdictions to be reduced. However, these changes will not come into effect yet, as federal regulations supersede provincial guidelines. Federal restrictions for international travellers are available online.

Full details about the province’s path to Green are available online..


Why isolation is important?

It only takes one person to infect many.

Isolation is about protecting others and slowing down the spread of COVID-19.

COVID-19 and the variants spread easily if given the chance. If you have been directed to isolate, it is extremely important to follow all public health guidelines and measures, including isolation. This is the most effective what of preventing the virus from spreading. 

No matter the type of isolation you are in, you should:

  • Monitor yourself for symptoms. Avoid using fever-reducing medications (e.g. acetaminophen, ibuprofen) as much as possible. These medications could mask an early symptom of COVID-19.
  • Wash your hands frequently
  • Limit your contact with others
  • Avoid contact with people who are at risk of more severe disease or outcomes, including:
    • older adults
    • people of any age with chronic medical conditions
    • people of any age who are immunocompromised

In all situations, you can leave your home or isolation location to get a COVID-19 test.


Isolating due to COVID-19 infection or appearance of COVID-19 symptoms

 

Who:

  • Individuals advised by Public Health, a physician or a peace officer, including confirmed cases of COVID-19, MUST isolate
  • Individuals who have TWO OR MORE of the following symptoms MUST isolate until they have a negative COVID-19 test result
  • If your community, or health zone is currently in the Lockdown and Red Alert Levels, you will need to isolate if you have ONE OR MORE of the listed COVID-19 symptoms 
  • Household members of individuals who are isolating MUST isolate if they are unable to limit direct contact with the individual who is isolating. For example, a parent caring for a young child.
  • Even if you have been vaccinated you need to isolate if directed.

How long: as directed by Public Health

What to do:

  • Stay at home and monitor yourself for symptoms, even just one mild symptom.
  • Do not go to school, work, other public areas or use public transportation (e.g., buses, taxis).
  • Avoid contact with other people to help prevent transmission of the virus prior to developing symptoms or at the earliest stage of illness
  • Do not have any guests, even if you are outdoors.
  • Isolate in a housing unit in which no other person lives; this unit must include a bathroom, kitchen, and sleeping quarters.
  • If you are isolating in a housing unit with others, all those living with you must isolate.

Avoid isolating at home if you cannot separate yourself from those who live with you. For example, if:

  • you live in a group or communal living setting
  • you live in the same household with large families or many people
  • your location is a camp, student dorm or other group setting where there is close contact, and you share common spaces

Phase 2 on the path to Green allows restrictions for travellers from Maine and other international jurisdictions to be reduced. However, these changes will not come into effect yet, as federal regulations supersede provincial guidelines. Federal restrictions for international travellers are available online.

Full details about the province’s path to Green are available online..

 

 

Isolating due to travel

The following types of travellers do NOT need to isolate upon entering New Brunswick:

  • New Brunswick residents returning home from rotational work within Canada
  • Anyone travelling from Atlantic Canada, Avignon, and Témiscouata (Quebec)
  • Anyone travelling within Canada who has received at least 1 dose of the COVID-19 vaccine
  • Accessing child custody or travelling to receive childcare
  • Travelling residents of Campobello Island
  • People driving through NB
  • Pilots and crew of commercial and charter aircraft, water vessels and trains
  • Non-resident commercial truck drivers
  • Residents of Listuguj and Pointe-à-la-Croix, QC, at entry at Campbellton

The following types of travellers are required to isolate upon entering New Brunswick:

  • Anyone travelling within Canada who has NOT received at least 1 dose of the COVID-19 vaccine; they can be released from isolation with a negative COVID-19 test taken on day 5-7
  • Anyone travelling from an international destination who has not received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine; they must isolate for 14 days and submit for a COVID-19 test on day 10, as well as follow any federal quarantine and testing requirements

While individuals may have exemptions from isolation for travel, they may be directed to isolate for other reasons.

You will be directed by public health or border officials, including peace officers, on the type of isolation required.

Children under 12 years of age must follow the same isolation requirements as the other people they are travelling with.

(Those traveling to fulfill a custody agreement are not required to isolate.)

 

 

Types of isolation

The Designated Isolation Facility program is no longer in effect. If you registered for travel before Thursday, June 17th, and were directed to isolate at one of the province’s isolation hotels, you are now required to arrange your own suitable isolation location. Travellers looking for more information can call: 1-844-462-8387.

For those who are presently still isolating in a Designated Facility, please follow the release instructions in the welcome package you received upon arrival.

When you register for travel (Travel Registration), you will be directed to isolate based on the type of traveller that you are.

Home isolation

Who:

  • Anyone travelling within Canada who has NOT received at least 1 dose of the COVID-19 vaccine
  • Anyone travelling from an international destination who has not received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine

How long: 

Anyone isolating after returning from within Canada who does not meet the immunization requirement is will be able to be tested for COVID-19 test on day five of their isolation period. If they get a negative result on their day 5 test, they may be released from isolation. Everyone isolating with them can also be released from isolating at this time.

Anyone isolating after returning from international travel who does not meet the immunization requirements is required to isolate for 14 days and get a COVID-19 test on Day 10.

What to do:

  • Stay at home and monitor yourself for symptoms, even just one mild symptom.
  • Leave home only for medical needs or for contactless pick-up of groceries and essentials.
  • Do not go to school, work, other public areas or use public transportation (e.g., buses, taxis).
  • Do not have any guests, even if you are outdoors.
  • Isolate in a housing unit in which no other person lives; this unit must include a bathroom, kitchen, and sleeping quarters.
  • If you are isolating in a housing unit with others, all those living with you must isolate for the period of time that you are required to isolate.

Work isolation

Who:

  • Critical infrastructure workers as approved by WorkSafeNB

How long: As directed by WorkSafeNB

What to do:

  • You must stay at home at all times, except to go to and from work, to meet medical needs and to pick up necessities of life, as long as you can do so while avoiding contact with others by using curbside pickup or delivery.
  • Other members of the household will not be required to isolate;
  • You should stay away from other members of your household as much as possible;
  • Other household members should minimize contact with others and follow all Public Health guidelines that apply to their health zone's alert level.
  • Everyone should be vigilant in self-monitoring for symptoms and getting tested and isolating as soon as possible should symptoms develop.

In all types of isolation:

If you start to develop symptoms while isolating, you must:

  • remain isolated from others as soon as you notice your first symptom
  • immediately call Tele-Care 8-1-1 OR complete the online self-assessment form to discuss your symptoms and travel history, and follow their instructions carefully
  • if you develop urgent symptoms (i.e. difficulty breathing), call 911 or your local emergency help line and inform them that:
    • you may have COVID-19
    • are at high risk for complications

Note: If you are living with a person who is isolated because they have or are suspected to have COVID-19, your isolation period will be extended for an additional 14 days. Seek direction from public health.

People with COVID-19 do not always recognize their early symptoms. Even if you do not have symptoms now, it is possible to transmit COVID-19 before you start showing symptoms or without ever developing symptoms.

 

Coping with isolation

Isolation can at times be needed to prevent the spread of a virus in a community.  Unfortunately, this can worsen feelings of loneliness or abandonment.  People placed in isolation may experience a wide range of feelings, including relief, fear, anger, sadness, irritability, guilt or confusion.  Humans are social creatures and need connection to others to thrive, which can make isolation challenging. For suggestions that may help you through this challenging time, click here.  


 

  1. Mandarin / 临时外国工人如何应对自我隔离
  2. Spanish  / Afrontar el aislamiento para trabajadores extranjeros temporales
  3. Tagalog / Paano Makayanan ang Isolation para sa mga Pansamantalang Banyagang Manggagawa
  4. English  / Coping with Isolation – For Temporary Foreign Workers
  5. French  /  Surmonter les difficultés de d'isolement – pour les Travailleurs étrangers temporaires