FREDERICTON (GNB) – Three new provincial court judges have been appointed, Justice Minister and Attorney General Marie-Claude Blais announced today.

The appointments of Kenneth L. Oliver of Fredericton, D. Troy Sweet of Moncton and Brigitte Volpé of Saint-Jacques, are effective immediately.

Judge Pierre F. Dubé, currently sitting in Campbellton, will now serve as travelling judge within the province and is also being re-assigned to Burton.

“The assignment and appointments of these judges will ensure the timely management of court cases,” said Blais. “All of the judges appointed today are well-respected lawyers and have extensive legal experience. I am confident that their leadership will serve the public well.”

Oliver received his law degree from the University of New Brunswick and was called to the bar in 1984. He worked with the same law firm from then until October 2000, when he began to work with the Office of the Attorney General - Public Prosecutions Services. He worked as a Crown Prosecutor in Fredericton and then Woodstock. Oliver is a member of the New Brunswick Crown Prosecutors Association and a former member of the New Brunswick Criminal Trial Lawyers Association. He is assigned to the provincial court in Burton.

Volpé obtained her law degree from Université de Moncton and was called to the bar in 1995. She is currently a partner with a firm in the Edmundston area. She has served on the Barreau du Madawaska Inc. as president, past-president and vice-president. Since 2005, Volpé has appeared on behalf of the Minister of Finance to hear appeals in regards to the Revenue Administration Act. She is currently president of la Fondation de l'Hôpital Régional d'Edmundston while also having served as vice-president and board member of this organization. Volpé is assigned to the provincial court in Edmundston.

Sweet obtained his law degree from the University of New Brunswick and was called to the bar in 1989. He is currently a partner with a firm in the Moncton area. Sweet has maintained a practice in Moncton while specializing in criminal law, mental health tribunals, military, litigation and immigration law. As a member of the Indigenous Bar Association, he currently does work with the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat. He is bilingual and is a member of l'Association des juristes d'expression française du Nouveau-Brunswick. Sweet is assigned to the provincial court in Moncton.

These appointments bring the number of full-time provincial court judges to 24, with nine supernumerary judges.