FREDERICTON (GNB) – The New Brunswick Public Library Service has been awarded the Dayton M. Forman Award for 2013 by CNIB for its work in removing barriers for people with print disabilities.

The library's executive director, Sylvie Nadeau, accepted the award today at the CNIB 2013 Braille Conference in Toronto on behalf of Post-Secondary Education Training and Labour Minister Jody Carr.

“This national award testifies to the excellence of our province's public library system and the strong partnerships that we have established and continue to nurture,” said Carr. “Moreover, it shows our government's commitment to ensuring equitable services for all New Brunswickers - in this case access to resources for those with print disabilities.”

The award was established by the CNIB Library Board in 1996 and recognizes outstanding leadership in the advancement of library and information services for Canadians living with vision loss or print disabilities. New Brunswick received the award based on initiatives that remove barriers and for the manner in which services respond to client needs and feedback.

“With their outstanding leadership in providing accessible, equitable library services to all patrons, the Province of New Brunswick has significantly improved access to information for the tens of thousands of residents who cannot read standard print due to significant vision loss or a physical or learning disability,” said Denise Coward, CNIB's provincial director for New Brunswick. “Their commitment to developing and implementing innovative service solutions has turned the concept of accessibility into a tangible reality - and has set a benchmark for other provincial and municipal library systems throughout Canada to follow.”

Carr said that a strong public library system and access to resource material is vital to supporting the objectives of the Labour Force and Skills Development Strategy, which are to improve workforce readiness and to get more people working.

The award is offered in tribute to Dr. Dayton M. Forman, an exceptional humanitarian and longstanding CNIB volunteer, who exemplified the leadership required to make a difference in the lives of Canadians who cannot easily access printed material. There are an estimated 75,000 New Brunswickers who have a print disability.

CNIB is the current name for what had been known as the Canadian National Institute for the Blind.


●    New Brunswick Public Library Service
●    CNIB