Government of New Brunswick

Q1. What is a sport fish?

A . Sport fish refers to sea-run Atlantic salmon, landlocked salmon, brook (speckled) trout, brown trout, lake trout, rainbow trout, arctic char and smallmouth bass.

This is a legal definition under the federal Martime Provinces Fishery Regulations (Fisheries Act).
 

Q2. What is an angling line?

A. An angling line is a line that must be held in the hand or closely attended and may have up to 3 hooks with no more than 3 points per hook.
 

Q3. What is a set line?

A. A set line is only used in the winter fishery. The line must be closely attended and visible to the angler at all times. Each set line is restricted to 1 hook with only 1 point.  
 

Q4. What is Fish NB Days?

A. Twice a year, NBers are encouraged to get out and try fishing or ice fishing. An angling licence is not required for residents or non-residents on Fish NB Days unless the angler wishes to retain landlocked salmon (48 to 63 cm fork length).

Fish NB Days generally occur on the first full weekend in June; and during the ice fishing season it takes place during the Family Day long weekend, only on those waters that are open to ice fishing.

To verify the dates, check your copy of the Fish Book – Summary of Regulations or the Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development’s website on Fish NB Days.

NOTE: All current bag limits, closures and other restrictions are still in effect on Fish NB Days. Access to private waters, Crown Reserve waters and Crown Leases requires the appropriate licences and landowner’s permission. Individuals whose angling privileges have been revoked cannot fish anywhere in the province on Fish NB Days.
   

Q5. What fish species are in New Brunswick and where can I find them?

A. There are over 50 species of fish in New Brunswick. Information on some species can be found by clicking on the Species Fact Sheets link on the Department’s Fish page under the General section.

A more comprehensive list, as well as pictures of each species, can be found at the University of New Brunswick’s/Canadian Rivers Institute’s Inland Fish Species of New Brunswick.

For information on where to find them, try contacting your local Fish & Game club or local fishing/tackle retailer.
   

Q6. Where is a good place to go fishing in my area?

A. Information on where to fish may best be obtained from local fishing forums/social media groups.
   

Q7. Where can I go ice fishing?

A. Consult the Ice Fishing Summary.
   

Q8. Where can I find information to plan a fishing trip.

A. For information on planning a fishing trip, check out the Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture’s Fishing and Hunting  webpage.
  

Q9. How do I find a Guide or Outfitter?

A. On the Fish page, look under the Guides & Day Adventures section at the bottom of the page. See the Hunting and Fishing Guides Directory for a list of guides. A list of Outfitters is available through the Department of Tourism.
   

Q10. Can I fish at night?

A. You can fish at night in tidal waters; however you cannot fish for sport fish or certain non-sport fish in some areas i.e. striped bass. For more information contact the Department of Fisheries and Oceans: Gulf Region Recreational Fisheries or  Maritimes Region Recreational Fisheries.

In inland waters during the open water season you can fish beginning 2 hours before sunrise and ending 2 hours after sunset.

During ice fishing season you can fish 30 minutes before sunrise until 30 minutes after sunset. 
   

Q11. Do I need a licence to fish in tidal water?

A. An angling licence is not required to fish in tidal waters unless a landlocked salmon ≥ 48 cm and ≤ 63 cm (fork length) is retained.
   

Q12. What can I use for bait?

A. Bait rules vary depending on the waterbody you are fishing:

  • In inland waters of NB live fish cannot be used as bait. Dead bait may be used but cannot include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.
  • In tidal waters of NB live fish may be used as bait provided they are found in NB waters. Neither live nor dead bait may include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.
  • In boundary waters with Maine live fish may be used as bait if they were captured from the water being fished. Neither live nor dead bait may include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp. 
       

Q13. What’s the season for…

A. Fishing seasons vary by location and species. Consult the Fish Book – Summary of Regulations (available in hard copy at authorized vendorsService New Brunswick (SNB) centres and all Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development offices) and choose the Recreational Fishery Area (RFA) of interest. You can also check out the Fishing Regulations Web Map or Fishing Regulations Mobile Map (found under Interactive Maps on the Fish page).
   

Q14. I found a tag on my fish. What should I do?

A. A tagged fish is usually part of a research project. If it is an Atlantic salmon or a striped bass with a Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) tag, please remove the tag and send it, along with the date and capture, to the address on the back of the tag:

Science Branch,
Department of Fisheries and Oceans
PO Box 5030,
Moncton, NB  E1C 9B6

You can also send the information and a photo of the tag by email to Fishtag@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Be sure to include your name, address and phone number/email for contact purposes.

Anglers who return tags from Atlantic salmon will have their names entered in the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization (NASCO) tag return incentive draw. Each year, a grand prize of US $2,500 is awarded as well as a US $1,500 prize for the North American area.

For other fish species, check the tag for instructions or for any contact information. If there is no information and it is a legally harvestable fish, it is at the angler’s discretion whether to harvest the fish or not. You may also provide the date, specifics and location of capture, as well as a picture if possible, to the Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development.
   

Q15. I caught a fish that has something wrong with it. What do I do with it?

A. If the fish can be legally harvested, feel free to retain it, preferably on ice, and contact the nearest Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development office as soon as possible. Otherwise, take some pictures of the fish.

Some common diseases and issues could be furunculosisfungus, and/or small parasites commonly known as "Black spot” (also see NS’s pamphlet on Black spot) and “Yellow grub”.
   

Q16. Where can I get information about crayfish in NB?

A. Depending on the information you are looking for, check out these links: Species and Status Database and/or the Non-native Crayfish link under the Aquatic Invasive Species tab. As well, you can contact the NB Museum as the museum has been documenting and collecting information for many years about the location and species of crayfish in NB. 
   

Q17. Is there an Adopt-A-Stream program in NB?

A. There is currently no provincial Adopt-A-Stream program; however, you could check with your local watershed organization.

Q18. Where can I buy a resident/non-resident angling licence?

A. Resident and non-resident angling licences are available for purchase:

Q19. How much does an angling licence cost?

A. See Fees for cost of various classes of angling licences.
   

Q20. Do youth under the age of 16 require an angling licence?

A. For all species of fish except Atlantic salmon:

Youth under the age of 16 do not require an angling licence and have their own daily bag limit and possession limit of allowable species, including landlocked salmon greater than 35cm but less than 48cm.

Atlantic salmon:

Youth under the age of 16 may fish for Atlantic salmon if accompanied by an angler with a valid salmon licence; however, the licence holder must include the child’s Atlantic salmon catch in the adult’s daily live release limit.

Resident anglers aged 10 to 15 years must purchase an Atlantic salmon licence if they want their own daily live release limit of Atlantic salmon and/or their own bag limit of landlocked salmon that are ≥ 48 cm and ≤ 63 cm (fork length). NOTE: The minimum size limit for landlocked salmon is 35 cm; however, only those from 48 to 63 cm require an Atlantic salmon tag if retained. Fish greater than 63 cm must be released.

Crown Reserve:

For licence requirements for youth on Crown Reserve waters see the Crown Reserve section.
 

Q21. Do I need a licence to fish in tidal water?

A. An angling licence is not required to fish in tidal waters unless a landlocked salmon ≥ 48 cm and ≤ 63 cm (fork length) is retained.
  

Q22. What is Fish NB Days?

A. Twice a year, NBers are encouraged to get out and try fishing or ice fishing. An angling licence is not required for residents or non-residents on Fish NB Days unless the angler wishes to retain landlocked salmon (48 to 63 cm fork length).

Fish NB Days generally occur on the first full weekend in June and on the Family Day long weekend during ice fishing season.

To verify the dates, check your copy of the Fish Book – Summary of Regulations or the Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development’s website on Fish NB Days.

NOTE: All current bag limits, closures and other restrictions are still in effect on Fish NB Days. Access to private waters, Crown Reserve waters and Crown Leases requires the appropriate licences and landowner’s permission. Individuals whose angling privileges have been revoked cannot fish anywhere in the province on Fish NB Days/Winter Fish NB Days.

The Fisheries Act, Maritime Provinces Fishery Regulations, and the Fishery (General) Regulations are all sources of information that pertain to angling regulations. Check them out! 

You can also check out the Department of Energy and Resource Development’s Fishing Regulations Web Map or Fishing Regulations Mobile Map (found under Interactive Maps on the Fish page).
   

Q23. Can I fish at night?

A. You can fish at night in tidal waters; however you cannot fish for sport fish or certain non-sport fish in some areas i.e. striped bass. For more information contact the Department of Fisheries and Oceans: Gulf Region Recreational Fisheries or Maritimes Region Recreational Fisheries.

In inland waters during the open water season you can fish beginning 2 hours before sunrise and ending 2 hours after sunset.

During ice fishing season you can fish 30 minutes before sunrise until 30 minutes after sunset. 

Q24. Do I need a licence to fish in tidal water?

A. An angling licence is not required to fish in tidal waters unless a landlocked salmon ≥ 48 cm ≤ 63 cm (fork length) is retained.
  

Q25. What can I use for bait?

A. Bait rules vary depending on the waterbody you are fishing:

  • In inland waters of NB live fish cannot be used as bait. Dead bait may be used but cannot include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny-rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.
  • In tidal waters of NB live fish may be used as bait provided they are found in NB waters. Neither live nor dead bait may include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny-rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.
  • In boundary waters with Maine live fish may be used as bait if they were captured from the water being fished. Neither live nor dead bait may include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny-rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.
       

Q26. What’s the season for…

A. Fishing seasons vary by location and species. Consult the Fish Book – Summary of Regulations (available in hard copy at authorized vendorsService New Brunswick (SNB) centres and all Natural Resources and Energy Development offices) and choose the Recreational Fishery Area (RFA) of interest.

You can also check out the Fishing Regulations Web Map or Fishing Regulations Mobile Map (found under Interactive Maps on the Fish page).
  

Q27. How do I stay current with the fishing regulations?

A. In season regulation changes can be searched at the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ (DFO) Orders registry for each the Gulf or Maritimes region. Other useful webpages include: Gulf Region Recreational Fisheries and Maritimes Region Recreational Fisheries.

You can also check out the Fishing Regulations Web Map or Fishing Regulations Mobile Map found under Interactive Maps on the Fish page. Note that there could be a lag time between DFO notification and web map update depending on the day.
   

Q28. I have a specific enforcement related question.

A. Specific enforcement related questions should be directed to Conservation Officers at the provincial Department of Public Safety or Conservation & Protection officers with the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans: Gulf and/ or Maritimes regions.
  

Q29. What are the rules for deep sea fishing or coastal fishing?

A. Marine fishing is regulated by the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO). For information contact the appropriate DFO region: Gulf (Gulf of St. Lawrence waters) or Maritimes (Bay of Fundy waters).
   

Q30. What are the rules for shellfish (clams, mussels) harvesting?

A. Shellfish harvesting is regulated by the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO). For information contact the appropriate DFO region: Gulf (Gulf of St. Lawrence waters) or Maritimes (Bay of Fundy waters) or check out the Shellfish Harvesting Map.  

Q31. Which lakes are stocked?

A. For a list of waters stocked by the department, look under the Stocked Waters section on the Fish page:

Q32. I want to build/stock a private fish pond. What are the rules?

A. The Department of Environment and Local Government should be contacted to determine if a Watercourse and Wetland Alteration (WAWA) permit is required for the construction/operation of the pond.

For stocking a man-made pond, the Department of Agriculture and Aquaculture (DAAF) should be contacted to inquire about and/or obtain an aquaculture license. DAAF has the lead role in licensing and enforcement of the Acts and Regulations governing private and commercial fish ponds and should be able to provide the correct legal advice to those interested in stocking, purchasing or selling fish. If the pond is a natural waterbody on private property, an aquaculture license is usually not required.

To stock the pond with fish, a federal Introductions and Transfers license is required from the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO). Call (506) 752-9109 or email NBITC.XMAR@dfo-mpo.gc.ca for information and applications.
    

Q33. Where can I buy fish to stock my pond?

A. Contact the Department of Agriculture and Aquaculture (DAAF) for informationon where to purchase fish to stock a licensed pond. DAAF has the lead role in licensing and enforcement of the Acts and Regulations governing private and commercial fish ponds and should be able to provide a listing of all licensed growers in the Province. 

Q34. What is Crown Reserve?

A. New Brunswick's Crown Reserve system is a limited entry fishery, whereby angling opportunities on prime salmon and brook trout angling waters are allocated on a rod-per-day basis. There are three types of Crown Reserves: Regular, Daily and Live Release. For more information see the Crown Reserve Waters section on the Department’s Fish page.
  

Q35. Where can I get a copy of the Crown Reserve maps?

A. Information on Crown Reserves can be found under the Crown Reserve Waters section on the Fish page. For Crown Reserve maps, check out Crown Reserve Stretches.
   

Q36. What are the rules for Crown Reserve substitution?

A. Information on Crown Reserves can be found under the Crown Reserve Waters section on the Fish page. For specific information on substitutions, see Substitution of Party Members.
   

Q37. Where can I get a copy of the Crown Reserve statistics?

A. Information on Crown Reserves can be found under the Crown Reserve Waters section on the Fish page. For specific information on statistics, see Catch and Effort.
   

Q38. What are the rules for youth on Crown Reserve?

A. Youth under the age of 16 may participate in Crown Reserve without being required to hold a licence or be a Crown Reserve party member.

If a youth is angling on Crown Reserve waters and is not a party member:

  • He/she must be accompanied (visual and/or auditory contact of each other without the aid of artificial devices except medically-prescribed eyeglasses or hearing aids) by a licensed Crown Reserve angler.
  • The licensed Crown Reserve angler and the youth may not angle at the same time.
  • The young person’s catch must be included in the live release limit of the licensed Crown Reserve angler.
  • The adult licensed Crown Reserve angler is legally respon­sible to ensure that the youth complies with all regulations.

If a youth under the age of 16 is a party member:

  • The youth must possess the appropriate Crown Reserve Licence for the stretch being angled.
  • On Atlantic salmon Crown Reserve stretches:

– If the youth is 10-15 years of age and possesses a Class 8 or 17 salmon angling licence, they may angle alone and they have their own live release limit;

– If the youth does not possess the appropriate salmon angling licence required on the stretch being angled, they must be accompanied (visual and/or auditory contact of each other without the aid of artificial devices except medically-prescribed eyeglasses or hearing aids) by a licensed Crown Reserve angler and their catch must be included with that other party member’s live release limit. This also includes all youth under the age of 10 who are not eligible to purchase a salmon angling licence.

  • On Brook Trout Crown Reserve Stretches:

– Youth under 16 years of age do not require a Class 7, 8, 9, 10, 16, or 17 angling licence, but do require a Crown Reserve Licence.

       

Q39. What are some important Crown Reserve dates?

A. Here are some important Crown Reserve dates for 2019:

February 4th

Application period begins for Regular Crown Reserve Water

March 1st

Applications for Regular Crown Reserve Water must be received at the Fish and Wildlife Branch by 4:30 p.m.

March 25th

Regular Crown Reserve Water draw results available here.

April 18th

Successful candidates to the Regular Crown Reserve draw must submit their stretch payment to the Fish and Wildlife Branch by 4:30 p.m.

May 6th

The listing of Regular Crown Reserve stretches not allocated in the draw or paid for will be made available here

May 13th

Unsuccessful applicant booking period begins at 8:30 a.m. and lasts two consecutive weeks. The listing of available stretches will be made available here

June 10th to September 15th

Regular Crown Reserve angling season.

May 27th to September 9th

Booking for Daily and Live Release Crown Reserve available stretches.

June 1st to September 15th

Daily and Live Release Crown Reserve angling season.

June 3rd

Open booking period begins at 8:30 a.m. and lasts until the end of the regular Crown Reserve angling season. The listing of available stretches will be made available here

The conservation and management of Atlantic salmon, including seasons, bag limits, closures, etc. is the responsibility of the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans. The Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development issues the angling licenses and any available tags.
    

Q40. Where can I find information on salmon runs or salmon barrier counts?

A. For information on Atlantic salmon runs and/or barrier counts, visit the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ website for Count of Atlantic Salmon in Rivers.
  

Q41. Where can I find information on in-season river closures due to low water/warm water?

A. The federal Department of Fisheries & Oceans (DFO) is responsible for the in-season river closures. Closures (and re-openings) can be found here. The provincial Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development’s Fishing Regulations Web Map (found under Interactive Maps on the Fish page) will generally also show these closures and re-openings (although there could be a lag time between DFO notification and web map update depending on the day).
   

Q42. How do I know if areas are closed mid-season?

A. To know if there are in-season closures, check the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ website on Recreational Fisheries before you head out fishing! You may also check on the provincial Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development’s Fishing Regulations Web Map (found under Interactive Maps on the Fish page). This application will generally also show these closures and reopenings (although there could be a lag time between DFO notification and the web map update depending on the day).
  

Q43. I found a tag on my Atlantic salmon.

A. If you catch a tagged Atlantic salmon, please remove the tag and send it, along with the date and location of capture, to the address on the back of the tag:

Science Branch,
Department of Fisheries and Oceans
PO Box 5030,
Moncton, NB  E1C 9B6

You can also send the information and a photo of the tag by email to Fishtag@dfo-mpo.gc.ca. Be sure to include your name, address and phone number for contact purposes and to receive information on your fish.

Anglers who return tags will have their names entered in the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization (NASCO) tag return incentive draw. Each year, a Grand Prize of US $2,500 is awarded as well as a US $1,500 prize for the North American area.

Q44. My fish is covered in black spots that look like pepper or is full of yellow cysts or grubs. Is it safe to eat?

A. Yes, it is generally safe to eat these fish provided they are fully cooked. These are small parasites (trematodes) commonly known as "Black spot” and “Yellow grub.” They are common in many fish species in New Brunswick waters and elsewhere (see NS’s pamphlet on Black spot). The presence of these parasites does not pose a human health problem.
    

Q45. Are fish in NB safe to eat? Are there any consumption advisories?

A. The only current health advisory for freshwater fish in New Brunswick relates to mercury contamination. Guidelines have been developed for the consumption of brook (speckled) trout, lake trout, landlocked salmon, smallmouth bass, perch, cusk (burbot), pickerel, striped bass and catfish, but exclude Atlantic salmon. For more information, contact Health Canada or check out NB’s Public Advisories and Alerts.

Questions and concerns related to water quality and/or quanitity should be addressed to the provincial Department of Environment and Local Government and/or the federal Environment and Climate Change Canada.
  

Q46. Where can I get information about water levels?

A. Check out the following webpages for some information on water levels: Environment and Local Government  and/or Environment and Climate Change Canada.
  

Q47. Where can I get information about or report blue-green algae/algal blooms/cyanbacteria blooms?

A. To report an algal bloom, contact the provincial Department of Environment and Local Government. For the Regional office nearest you, click the Offices tab for contact information.

To inquire about an algal bloom, or other public health advisories, check out the Department of Health’s webpages on Blue-Green Algae and/or Public Health Advisories.
  

Q48. My lake/pond is full of vegetation. Can I do anything about it?

A. To inquire about vegetation in a waterbody, contact the provincial Department of Environment and Local Government. For the Regional office nearest you, click the Offices tab for contact information.
  

Q49. What are the rules for working near water? Do I need a permit?

A. Activities within 30 meteres of a waterecourse or wetland generally require a permit. For more information, contact the Department of Environment and Local Government to determine if a Watercourse and Wetland Alteration (WAWA) permit is required.

Q50. How do I report a fish kill?

A. To report a fish kill, call Canadian Coast Guard’s 24-hour reporting system at 1-800-565-1633 ext. 2 which will be for “pollution incident on land, in the air, or in to lakes and rivers”.  The call will be answered by Environment Canada.

Q51. Where can I learn about/report marine invasive species?

A. For information or to report a marine invasive species contact the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans. You can also check out www.nbinvasives.ca or contact coordinator@nbinvasives.ca.

 

Q52. Where can I learn about/report freshwater invasive species?

A. For information on some freshwater invasive species check out the links under the Aquatic Invasive Species tab, or check out www.nbinvasives.ca. To report an invasive species occurrence you can contact the NB Invasive Species Council or email: coordinator@nbinvasives.ca

   

Q53. What should I do if I catch a fish that I know doesn’t belong in that waterbody?

A. If you catch an invasive species please retain it, preferably on ice, and contact the nearest Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development as soon as possible.

Check out Interactive Maps on the Fish page:

Stocked Waters Interactive Map,

Fishing Regulations Web Map

Fishing Regulations Mobile Map


Q54. Where can I get a specific lake depth map?

A. Various lake depth maps are available on the Fish page under:

  • the General section: see Lake Depths for a list of lakes for which there are available depth maps (pdf format); and/or
  • he Interactive Maps section: see Lake Depths for an interactive map (ESRI application).
      

Q55. Is there a map that shows the public/private water and/or pools for fishing?

A. There is no definitive series of maps that differentiates public and private water, although there are some river plan maps that do indicate pool names and some ownership. Check out River maps – Crown public water and pools under the General section on the department’s Fish page. These can also be obtained from the department’s Public Service Desk by mail, fax or picked up at a cost of $5.25 per river. Additionally, there is a Southwest Miramichi River Angling and River Guide produced by the Atlantic Salmon Museum. This is also available from the department’s Public Service Desk for $29.95.
   

Q56. Where can I get a copy of the Crown Reserve maps?

A. Information on Crown Reserves can be found under the Crown Reserve Waters section on the Fish page. For Crown Reserve maps, check out Crown Reserve Stretches.

Q57. How do I know if a property has riparian fishing rights?

A. Proving riparian rights requires searching the original land grants. Some of this information is available for viewing through Service New Brunswick or inquiries can be made at the department’s Crown Lands Branch. Disagreements with private landowners ultimately requires resolution through a civil process (trespass).
 

Q58. How can I tell where the public/private pools are?

A. There is no definitive series of maps that differentiates public and private water, although there are some river plan maps that do indicate pool names and some ownership. Check out River maps under the General section on the department’s Fish page. These can also be obtained from the department’s Public Service Desk by mail, fax or picked up at a cost of $5.25 per river. Additionally, there is a Southwest Miramichi River Angling and River Guide produced by the Atlantic Salmon Museum. This is also available from the department’s Public Service Desk for $29.95.

Q659. Do I need a licence to fish in tidal water?

A. An angling licence is not required to fish in tidal waters unless a landlocked salmon ≥ 48 cm and ≤ 63 cm (fork length) is retained.
   

Q60. How do I know which waters are considered tidal?

A. For a list of tidal waters, click here. For those not listed, the boundary is the low-water mark at the time of low water as set by the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and defined in the Canadian Tide and Current Tables. For more information, contact your local Conservation & Protection officers at the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans: Gulf and/ or Maritimes regions.
   

Q61. How many rods can I use in tidal water?

A. When angling for sport fish in tidal waters during the regular open water season, only 1 angling line (ex. rod) that has a maximum of 3 hooks and 3 points per hook is permitted. If angling for any species of fish other than sport fish, up to 5 angling lines with a maximum of 6 hooks and 3 points per hook is permitted.

The same rule applies for ice fishing; however a set line may also be used.
   

Q62. What seasons/bag limits apply in tidal water?

A. The season and bag limits for sport fish in tidal waters are the same as that in inland waters. For species of fish other than sport fish, the seasons and bag limits vary. See Fish Book – Summary of Regulations or Ice Fishing Summary depending on the time of year that you are fishing.

You can also check out the Fishing Regulations Web Map or Fishing Regulations Mobile Map found under Interactive Maps on the Fish page.
   

Q63. Can I fish at night?

A. You can fish at night in tidal waters; however you cannot fish for sport fish and some non-sport fish in certain areas i.e. striped bass. For more information contact the Department of Fisheries and Oceans: Gulf Region Recreational Fisheries and Maritimes Region Recreational Fisheries.

In inland waters during the open water season, you can fish beginning 2 hours before sunrise and ending 2 hours after sunset.

During ice fishing season you can fish 30 minutes before sunrise until 30 minutes after sunset.
   

Q64. What can I use for bait?

A. In tidal waters of NB, live fish may be used as bait provided they are found in NB waters. Neither live nor dead bait may include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny-rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.

Q65. Where can I go ice fishing?

A. Consult the Ice Fishing Summary.
   

Q66. Do I need a licence to fish in tidal water?

A. An angling licence is not required to fish in tidal waters unless a landlocked salmon ≥ 48 cm and ≤ 63 cm (fork length) is retained.
   

Q67. Can I fish at night?

A. You can fish at night in tidal waters; however you cannot fish for sport fish or certain non-sport fish in some areas i.e. striped bass. For more information contact the Department of Fisheries and Oceans: Gulf Region Recreational Fisheries or Maritimes Region Recreational Fisheries.

During ice fishing season you can fish 30 minutes before sunrise until 30 minutes after sunset.
   

Q68. What can I use for bait?

A. Bait rules vary depending on the waterbody you are fishing:

  • In inland waters of NB live fish cannot be used as bait. Dead bait may be used but cannot include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.
  • In tidal waters of NB live fish may be used as bait provided they are found in NB waters. Neither live nor dead bait may include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.
  • In boundary waters with Maine, live fish may be used as bait if they were captured from the water being fished. Neither live nor dead bait may include bass, bullhead, sunfish, perch, other spiny rayed fish, chain pickerel, goldfish or other carp.
       

Q69. What is Fish NB Days?

A. Twice a year, NBers are encouraged to get out and try fishing or ice fishing. An angling licence is not required for residents or non-residents on Fish NB Days unless the angler wishes to retain landlocked salmon (48 to 63 cm fork length).

During the ice fishing season, Fish NB Days take place on the Family Day long weekend, only on those waters that are open to ice fishing.

To verify the dates, check your copy of the Fish Book – Summary of Regulations or the Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development’s website on Fish NB Days.

NOTE: All current bag limits, closures and other restrictions are still in effect on Fish NB Days. Access to private waters, Crown Reserve waters and Crown Leases requires the appropriate licences and landowner’s permission. Individuals whose angling privileges have been revoked cannot fish anywhere in the province on Fish NB Days.