Information on how New Brunswick will achieve the new normal

  


 

The COVID-19 state of emergency and you

Government has taken measures to protect the health and wellbeing of New Brunswickers during the COVID-19 pandemic. That has led to a State of Emergency and an emergency order restricting many ordinary activities during these extraordinary times.

The Mandatory Order includes rules and conditions aimed at reducing the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Everyone, including individuals, employers and businesses, must follow the order to ensure public health.

 


 

New Brunswick’s COVID-19 and economic recovery road map

Government has introduced New Brunswick's COVID-19 Detailed Alert Levels (Note: This document is under revision. November 20, 2020) to ensure the continued economic and social wellbeing for our province. Progress across all phases will be monitored closely to ensure the health and safety of citizens and to limit the resurgence of COVID-19 transmission within the province.

Throughout all the phases, as we progress towards a “new normal” for New Brunswick, it is critical that everyone adhere to public health measures and restrictions to help protect our communities and loved ones.

Alert levels and associated measures are determined by the Government of New Brunswick under the advice and guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health. These measures may be updated on regular basis based on new scientific knowledge or effectiveness of previous control measures in Canada or in other countries.     

Different regions of the province may be at different alert levels at a given time.

All businesses allowed to operate under any phase except GREEN are required to have a COVID-19 operational plan which aligns to public health and WorkSafeNB guidance to ensure they protect citizens, patrons and employees at all times.

COVID-19 Fall Pandemic Response and Preparedness Plan 2020 (Note: This document is under revision. November 20, 2020)

• Frequently Asked Questions: Changes to Yellow-Orange-Red Alert Levels (Nov. 21, 2020)

 


 

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Current public health alert level

Last updated: November 21, 2020 
   

Zones 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 are currently in the Yellow level.

Zone 1 (Moncton region) and Zone 2 (Saint John region) are in the Orange level.

During this time, Public Health measures and guidelines must still be followed.

Yellow Level – Information on what this will mean for you.

Orange Level – Information on what this will mean for you.

Non-essential travel in and out of zones in the Orange alert level (Nov 20)

Information for international and interprovincial travellers can be found here.


Masks are mandatory 

Under the Yellow level, masks are mandatory in most indoor places which include:

  • public spaces where the public and employees interact (retail businesses, malls, service centres, places of worship, restaurants and bars except while eating, etc.) and organized indoor gatherings in public spaces (e.g. weddings, funerals, etc.)
  • common areas like lobbies, elevators and hallways, and public shared spaces including those in private sector and government workspaces; and
  • public transportation.

Under the Orange level, wearing face masks is mandatory in public spaces, both indoors and outdoors. Outdoor public spaces include parks, playgrounds, markets, festival sites, dog parks, and walking trails. A mask is not required while walking, jogging or cycling with people in the same bubble, where they are unlikely to encounter people, or risk coming within two metres of, people from outside their bubble.

Continuous mask use is still required in seated venues with one metre physical distancing.

Previously existing mask policies continue to apply in hospitals, health care settings, public schools and early childhood learning facilities.

As approved by the Pandemic Task Force, children under two are exempt from wearing masks, as well as those with a medical condition that prevents them from wearing a mask.

Mandatory Masks – FAQ

 

 


 

Public Health phases and triggers

The public health phases mean people can see and plan for the kinds of restrictions that may be required to be put in place to protect New Brunswickers from COVID-19. This includes limiting human contact, as well as travel and business operations.  Based on comprehensive risk assessments conducted by Public Health, region or provincial limitation can be set in place.

The alert levels tell us all what public health measures need to be taken. Until there is a vaccine, community public health measures should be followed to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

The phased plan will allow health experts to monitor and evaluate the impact of the lifting of restrictions. At any time, restrictions that have been lifted may quickly be reinstated to protect public health. Restrictions may be put in place based on provincial, regional or local circumstances such as unlinked community outbreaks or cases that cannot be traced.

Risk assessments are triggered if the following occurs:

a) Going back one alert level would be assessed when: One item in each of two of the three columns are met.

b) Going back to red alert level would be assessed when: One or more in each of the three columns are met; OR by the presence of more than one trigger in any given column, plus the addition of one more trigger from any other column.
  

Epidemiology

  • Doubling time of cases in less than six (6) days (not applicable if we still have low number of cases).
  • More than three (3) unlinked chains of community transmission in less than a six (6) day period.
  • Outbreaks in high vulnerability settings where there is risk of transmission to the community.

Public Health

  • 10% or more of all contacts cannot be reached by Public Health within 24 hours.
  • Public Health is not able to reach or actively monitor all identified close contacts within 48 hours.
  • Insufficient facilities for non-hospitalized COVID-19 infected people who cannot be safely cared for at home (i.e. vulnerable populations, group settings which do not allow for self-isolation).
  • Compliance with public health directives and recommendations are no longer being followed by the public (e.g. physical distancing, masking).

Health Care

  • Inability to scale up to 2x the number of ICU patients from current census (including staffing).
  • Health system can no longer screen and test the required number of symptomatic patients in a timely manner.
  • Less than a four (4) week supply of PPE for double the current case load.
  • Insufficient face masks to provide to all patients seeking care even if cases double.
  • More admissions than discharges for COVID-19 over three (3) consecutive days.
  • Do not have baseline capacity in general health services, including through expansion of telemedicine for Covid-19 and usual care.
  • Health-care facilities can no longer be structured to reduce possibility of exposure at triage and all other locations.
  • Increasing number of new health-care worker infections for six (6) consecutive days (affect workforce, and indicates poor infection prevention and control practices)

 


 


Red level

 

Strict controls to flatten the curve and contain the virus as quickly as possible. COVID-19 is no longer controlled in the province.

Available services are limited to those that are essential, with mandatory public health measures in place such as physical distancing, business closures and travel restrictions.

Risk Assessment:

  • There are three (3) unlinked chains of community transmission within 6 days.
  • Health-care system is overwhelmed.
  • Public health measures are no longer effective.
  • Outbreaks and new clusters can no longer be controlled through testing, tracing and self-isolation measures.

Subject to the Public Health and WorkSafeNB COVID-19 general guidance, the following activities are allowed:

  • Frequent hand washing, surface cleaning and physical distancing (2m)
  • NEW: Single household bubble. A household bubble can be extended to caregivers or to an immediate family member requiring support.  
  • Outdoor gatherings with physical distancing of 5 people or less. Physical distancing required in all other settings.
  • NEW: Essential travel only is recommended in and out of Red level zones, however, people can continue to travel within the province for work, school, essential errands and medical appointments. 
  • Outdoor (drive-in) religious services only.
  • Community face masks are mandatory.
  • Non-urgent medical procedures and elective surgeries are postponed.
  • Strict visitor restrictions in health and long-term care facilities and similar vulnerable settings.
  • Primary care providers and regulated health professionals may operate utilizing virtual whenever possible.
  • NEW: Unregulated health professionals may operate under a COVID-19 operational plan, with enhanced public health measures suce as active screening of patrons, closed waiting rooms and enhanced barriers.
  • NEW: Personal services such as barbers, hair stylists or spas are closed.  
  • Daycares remain open with appropriate guidance.
  • K to 12 school is limited to virtual only. Teachers and employees in schools to teach virtually from their classrooms.
  • Post-secondary education can continue to operate in-person for all practical programs but only virtually in areas where it is possible.
  • All food and beverage will be reduced to drive-thru, take-out and delivery.
  • Gym and fitness facilities are closed, including other similar close contact sport or recreational businesses or facilities.
  • Public spaces such as casinos, amusement centres, bingo halls, arcades, cinemas and large live performance venues are closed.
  • NEW: Public Transit can operate with 2m distancing between riders AND continuous use of a mask. Ensure space is available for individuals who require 2m distancing for medical reasons (e.g. immunocompromised and those that can’t wear mask).
  • All other businesses and public services, including retail, can operate under a COVID-19 operational plan.

 


 


Orange level

 

Balancing the reopening of businesses and activities while preventing a resurgence of transmission. Significant risk that COVID-19 is no longer under control in the province.

Risk Assessment:

  • Travel-related cases and new chains of community transmission are accelerating.
  • Health-care system still able to manage but under pressure.
  • Compliance with public health measures decreasing.
  • Outbreaks can still be controlled through public health measures.

Subject to the Public Health and WorkSafeNB COVID-19 general guidance, the following activities are allowed:

  • NEW: Single household bubble. A household bubble can be extended to caregivers or to an immediate family member requiring support.
  • NEW: Essential travel only is recommended in and out of Orange level zones, however, people can continue to travel within the province for work, school, essential errands and medical appointments.
  • NEW: Outdoor gatherings with physical distancing of 25 people or fewer are permitted. Physical distancing is required in all other settings.
  • NEW: Faith venues can operate under a COVID-19 operational plan. In-person services are limited to 50 participants, or fewer depending upon the size of the facility, with two metres of physical distancing. Continuous mask wearing is required. No singing is permitted. Other indoor religious observances, funerals, celebrations of life, marriage ceremonies, receptions and social gatherings of more than 25 people are prohibited.
  • Wearing face masks is mandatory in public spaces, both indoors and outdoors. Outdoor public spaces include parks, playgrounds, markets, festival sites, dog parks, and walking trails. A mask is not required while walking, jogging or cycling with people in the same bubble, where they are unlikely to encounter people, or risk coming within two metres of, people from outside their bubble.
  • Non-urgent medical procedures and elective surgeries are allowed.
  • Strict visitor restrictions are to be maintained in settings with vulnerable people.
  • Primary care providers and regulated health professionals may operate but are urged to use virtual appointments whenever possible.
  • NEW: Unregulated health professionals, barbers, hair stylists or spas may operate under a COVID-19 operational plan, with enhanced public health measures such as active screening of patrons, closed waiting rooms, and enhanced barriers.
  • Daycares and K-12 schools are open under strict guidance. Virtual teaching is to be used for at-risk populations. Day camps are allowed.
  • Post-secondary educational institutions may operate.
  • Outdoor recreational activities are allowed, including campgrounds, ATV or snowmobile trails.
  • NEW: Recreational and sport organizations may operate but are limited to practices and/or skills and drills within a single team.
  • NEW: Gym, fitness facilities, and yoga studios may operate under a COVID-19 operational plan with additional public health measures, including:
    • Two metres of physical distancing, with masks, in low-intensity fitness classes such as yoga, tai chi, and stretching; and three metres of physical distancing for high-intensity activities such as spin, aerobics and boot camp.
    • active screening and record keeping of patrons.
    • closed locker rooms/common areas.
  • NEW: Entertainment venues such as casinos, amusement centres, bingo halls, arcades, cinemas and large live performance facilities may operate under a COVID-19 operational plan. The occupancy limit is set at 50 or fewer, depending upon the size of the venue and the ability to ensure two metres of physical distancing, with continuous mask use and record keeping.
  • NEW: Public Transit can operate with 1m distancing between riders AND continuous use of a mask. Ensure space is available for individuals who require 2m distancing for medical reasons (e.g. immunocompromised and those that can’t wear mask).
  • All other businesses, including food, beverage and retail, may operate under a COVID-19 operational plan. Distancing of two metres is required where food and beverages are served. Record keeping for seated venues is a requirement. Single household bubbles must be maintained. For example, people may not sit with people from another household at a restaurant.

 


 


Yellow level


Reopening of more businesses and activities after the ability to control transmission has been demonstrated. COVID-19 is controlled, still a risk of community transmission.

Risk Assessment:

  • Sporadic travel-related cases and isolated outbreaks are occurring.
  • Individual cases and outbreaks can be controlled through testing, tracing and self-isolation.

Subject to the Public Health and WorkSafeNB COVID-19 general guidance, the following activities are allowed:

  • NEW: Informal indoor gatherings of up to 20 people are permitted, and close contacts should be limited to a consistent list of family and friends.
  • Keep uncontrolled outdoor gatherings with physical distancing at 50 people or fewer.
  • Occupancy limits in controlled indoor and outdoor settings should remain at a level which allow for physical distancing. Record keeping for participants is required to facilitate contact tracing.
  • NEW: Sports teams can continue to play, following their operational plan, and tournaments or larger events may be permitted, subject to the approval of a plan.
  • NEW: Faith venues can continue to be open as long as one metre of distance is maintained, and everyone is wearing a mask. Masks must be worn, and two metres of distance must be in place, for singing to be permitted – otherwise, no singing is allowed.
  • Community face masks must be worn in public spaces (including retail businesses, malls, service centres, public transport, etc.) and at unofficial indoor gatherings in New Brunswick. However, community face masks are not a substitute for physical distancing.
  • Visitor restrictions are loosened in vulnerable settings with the use of personal protective equipment.
  • All types of businesses and activities are allowed to operate under a COVID-19 operational plan. Record keeping for seated venues is a requirement.
  • All educational and camp facilities are open under appropriate public health guidance, virtual to be used for at-risk groups.
  • NEW: Public Transit can operate at  full ridership with the continuous use of a mask.  Ensure space is available for individuals who require 2m distancing for medical reasons (e.g. immunocompromised and those that can’t wear mask).

Occupancy of any facility must be based on the ability to maintain physical distancing between people that are not close friends and family.

Controlled venues at which seating is offered for the purposes of eating, drinking, socialization, celebration, ceremony or entertainment are required to maintain a record of the names and contact information of all persons who attend. The same applies to anyone who hosts, organizes or permits gatherings larger than 50. Keep information in a secure place and not in the public view. More information can be found in Collection of names and contact information under the Mandatory Order COVID-19.

This will enable Public Health to conduct targeted contact tracing in an expeditious manner should there be a COVID-19 case associated with the facility.

 


 


Green level

 

After a vaccine and herd immunity or effective clinical treatment is available, or more is learned about how to protect people from the virus.

This transition to a new normal includes the reopening of all businesses and activities, with increased health and safety practices remaining part of daily life. All conditions are lifted with the exception of community face masks (facial coverings), which remain required to wear in public when ill.

 


 

Frequently asked questions

 

Prevention and protection:

Community face masks must be worn in most indoor places. This includes:

  • public spaces where the public and employees interact (retail businesses, malls, service centres, places of worship, restaurants and bars except while eating, etc.) and organized indoor gatherings in public spaces (e.g. weddings, funerals, etc.);
  • common areas like lobbies, elevators and hallways, and public shared spaces including those in private sector and government workspaces; and
  • public transportation.

Continuous mask use is still required in seated venues with one metre physical distancing.

Previously existing mask policies continue to apply in hospitals, health care settings, public schools and early childhood learning facilities.

As approved by the Pandemic Task Force, children under two are exempt from wearing masks, as well as those with a medical condition that prevents them from wearing a mask.

For information on how to properly put on and take off your mask, visit our fact sheet here.

Individuals who can’t find or buy a mask may use a cloth community masks that require no sewing which can be made from common materials such as a cotton bandanas or T-shirts and using elastics/rubber bands/string/cloth strips, or hair ties to secure it. Sew and no-sew instructions can be found here.

While diseases can make anyone sick, some individuals are more at risk of developing severe complications from an illness due to underlying medical conditions and age. If you are at risk for complications, you can take action to reduce your risk of getting sick from COVID-19.

People who identify with the following should act in an abundance of caution when out in the community.

  • People with medical conditions including:
    • Heart disease
    • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
    • Lung disease
    • Diabetes
    • Cancer
  • People with weakened immune systems from a medical condition or treatment, such as chemotherapy
  • Older adults

Public Health recommends the following to help you reduce your risk of contracting COVID-19:

  • If possible, only leave your home when it is absolutely necessary. Try to find safe alternatives for accessing the goods or services you need.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • If contact cannot be avoided, take the following precautions:
    • Keep at least two metres between yourself and the other person
    • Give a friendly wave instead of a handshake
    • Keep interactions brief
    • Follow the public health measures required by the businesses you are visiting
    • Clean hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, if not available, use alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
    • Carry alcohol-based hand sanitizer when you are outside of your home.
    • Avoid touching your mouth, nose, and eyes and/or food with your hands.
    • Avoid touching high-touch surfaces such as doorknobs, handrails and elevator buttons in public places.
    • If you need to touch surfaces in public places, use a tissue or your sleeve to cover your hand.
    • Avoid crowds and public gatherings.

Public Health will continue testing New Brunswickers for COVID-19 during all phases of our recovery. Anyone exhibiting two or more of the following symptoms (even if mild) should immediately self-isolate and call Tele-Care 8-1-1 for further direction.

  • fever,
  • a new cough, or worsening chronic cough,
  • sore throat,
  • runny nose,
  • headache,
  • a new onset of fatigue,
  • a new onset of muscle pain,
  • diarrhea,
  • loss of sense of taste,
  • loss of sense of smell, and
  • in children, purple markings on the fingers and toes

You can expect more aggressive random testing to occur in the weeks ahead.

 

General advice:

In the Yellow  level, informal indoor gatherings of up to 20 people are permitted, and close contacts should be limited to a consistent list of family and friends. Keep uncontrolled indoor or outdoor gatherings with physical distancing at 50 people or fewer.

Close friends are those you consider as part of your regular social circle.

 

Yes, however newborns are not fully immunized so caution should always be taken to protect them. This includes all the same measures we use for COVID-19, wash your hands, respiratory etiquette and staying away if sick.

If any member of the group has chronic health conditions or is unhealthy that would put the newborn at greater risk.

You should always be aware of who you have been in contact with over the past two weeks. These are the people who would need to be contacted by public health if you were to test positive for COVID-19.

 

Yes, in the Yellow level you can gather with friends and family but continue to keep gatherings as small as possible, especially if you have a vulnerable person in your family or have a child that attends daycare. Large gatherings are discouraged.

As per public health guidance, New Brunswickers are asked to only group together if proper public health measures can be followed. Such as:

  • Proper hand hygiene
  • Respiratory etiquette (cover your cough with tissues or your sleeve)
  • Frequent cleaning of surfaces
  • Physical distancing continues to be an important measure for reducing the spread of COVID-19 – even when physical distancing is not required within family and friend bubbles, it is still a good precautionary practice to adopt when possible

If you or someone in your group is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, please remain home and call Tele-Care 8-1-1 for further direction. if any member of the group has chronic health conditions that would put them at greater risk, or if they are in close contact with someone who could be vulnerable.

 

If they are able to, long-term care facilities may allow outdoor and indoor visits with controls in place.

 

Palliative patients are permitted to select two visitors to comfort and support them. The two individuals selected will be the only visitors permitted, and only one visitor is permitted at a time.

If a visitor requires a support person to visit (e.g. frail elderly spouse or individual with a disability), this person counts as the second chosen visitor. In exceptional cases, the support person can visit at the same time while respecting physical distancing in the facility. There can be no change in the two visitors chosen.

 

Visitor restrictions are coordinated by each regional health authority and are reviewed on a regular basis. For the latest visitor restrictions and guidelines, visit Horizon Health Network or the Vitalite Health Network.

 

Regional Health Authorities will be restarting non-emergency surgeries, diagnostic procedures and health services. This will be done in a progressive manner to ensure the safety of patients and staff.

Patients will be notified and scheduled for a screening appointment, where they will be tested for COVID-19. Immediately following the test, patients will be directed to self-isolate for three days before their scheduled surgery.

 

Large gatherings such as festivals, fairs and concerts are prohibited through Dec. 31, 2020, subject to change.

 

The State of Emergency declaration indicates all licenses, registrations, certificates and permits issued by the Province of New Brunswick valid as of March 16th, 2020 shall remain valid until June 30th, 2020 unless suspended by a court or by other authority under an Act of the Province. This includes inspection stickers. However, if the station and the client choose to do an inspection anyway, the supplies must be on hand to do so. No inspection should be performed if the station does not have the stickers on hand. Inspection stickers will be provided to stations to ensure they have the necessary supplies.

 

The use of community centres is not prohibited by the Mandatory Order COVID-19 as long as the ability to use them is in a manner that ensures you can maintain a distance of at least 2 metres from others. This would apply to all activities, programming and services provided by the centre. 

All are reminded to observe the directives and advice contained in the Order and provided by the Chief Medical Officer of Health and WorkSafeNB. This includes the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each organization to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishment. 

If owners or operators are unable to operate within the Order then they must not open their premises during the state of emergency. 

 

The safe operation of the bus service, including the determination of capacity, will be determined through the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan based on advice and guidance from Public Health and WorkSafeNB. Municipalities are encouraged to contact WorkSafeNB for assistance in its development. 

The Operational Plan will address elements such as physical distancing, including an appropriate number of patrons on the bus; cleaning and disinfecting; hand and respiratory hygiene; and pre-screening for symptoms. It is important to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 amongst employees, patrons and the public. 

Please note that rules on gatherings only applies to owners and occupiers of land (outdoor gatherings) or owners and occupiers of buildings (indoor gatherings).

 

Entry into Canada falls under federal jurisdiction and any inquiries regarding the conveyance of animals should be made to the Government of Canada. Please note that the Canada Border Services Agency has instituted a COVID-19 hotline related to cross-border travel and COVID-19 at 1-800-461-9999 or consult Border Information Service.

Regarding travel within Canada, it is important to note that people crossing interprovincial borders can bring significant health risks to New Brunswick. Entering New Brunswick for the purpose of adopting a pet is not permitted at this time.  

If New Brunswick volunteers deliver the animals to Nova Scotia or PEI, the Mandatory Order permits re-entry into New Brunswick, but residents are required to follow the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolation for 14 days upon their return. However, mandatory isolation could be avoided by utilizing commercial transport (e.g. hiring a commercial driver to deliver the animals).

Travel within New Brunswick is permitted provided that the organization follows the directives of the Order regarding physical distancing, preventing gatherings and the specific responsibilities of business owners/service providers. 

Businesses and non-profit organizations must also follow the control measures and directives of Public Health and WorkSafeNB. It is important for these settings to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 amongst employees, volunteers and the public. 

This includes the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene, and pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each organization to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishments and operations, including the provision of transportation. 

Please be aware that all provinces have their own travel restrictions; therefore, it is advised that individuals check with those provinces before travelling. 

 

 

Workers and business:

Public Health and WorkSafeNB have created guidance documents and templates to help support businesses preparing to re-open. Businesses that meet the requirements, must have a copy of their COVID-19 Operational Plan Guide on site as a Public Health Inspector, WorkSafeNB or representative from the Department of Public Safety may show up unannounced and request to see it.

 

Yes, please visit our resource page on the GNB COVID-19 website.

 

Our WorkingNB services recently reopened to provide virtual support to NB job-seekers and employers. Staff are now available to any New Brunswick employer or job-seeker looking for support over the phone and through virtual services online

As part of those virtual services, JobMatchNB has been launched to connect employers with job-seekers. This will help to address the job shortage in key sectors including fisheries and agriculture as a result of Temporary Foreign Workers not able to cross the border and work here this season. We need New Brunswickers to fill these positions. By stepping up, you’ll be helping your community and our province’s economy.

NBJobs.ca is also updated daily and many opportunities are available.

 

There are many jobs available in fisheries and agriculture. Visit JobMatchNB to explore those opportunities. NBJobs.ca is also updated daily and many opportunities are available. You can also contact WorkingNB for support.

 

We are working closely with universities to find solutions as quickly as we can in identifying employers who are still able to offer students opportunities, such as connecting them with newly designed virtual employment opportunities.

We are also working closely with regional WorkingNB offices in partnership with ONB to identify key industry sectors that are deemed essential or critical and are able to offer employment opportunities even while managing the COVID 19 situation. We encourage all students to keep checking www.NBJOBS.ca website as postings are updated daily. 

The federal government also has supports in place for post-secondary students. Students may be eligible for the new Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). Eligibility should be confirmed with the Government of Canada.

Students may also be eligible for the Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB) which provides $1,250 a month from May through August. College and university students currently in school, planning to start in September, or who graduated in December 2019 may be eligible. Working students earning less than $1,000 per month will be able to apply.

 

A list of provincial and federal supports are available online.

 

Farmers markets are permitted to reopen if they can enforce physical distancing measures and other recommendations of the chief medical officer of health.

Farmers markets are an essential part of our food-supply chain, and we appreciate the work they are doing to provide local, safe and healthy food to New Brunswickers in these difficult times.

Farmers markets need to develop an overall COVID-19 Operation Plan. In addition, each vendor must develop an individual operational plan. More information on how to establish these operational plans is available online.

 

The revised Mandatory Order allows businesses/private training companies to resume activities. However, virtual education options should be continued wherever possible.

Businesses/private training companies admitting patrons must follow the control measures and directives of Public Health and WorkSafeNB. It is important for these settings to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 amongst employees, patrons and the public. 

This includes the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene, and pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each business/private training company to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishment. 

As the driving component of the training is an extension of the workplace, it is also subject to the requirements of the Operational Plan and advice of WorkSafeNB. This includes wearing protective equipment when workplaces cannot ensure minimal interaction of people within two metres of each other.

 

If the animals have already arrived in New Brunswick, travel within the province is permitted provided that the service provider follows the directives of the Mandatory Order regarding physical distancing, preventing gatherings and the specific responsibilities of business owners/service providers.

The Mandatory Order permits re-entry into the province following interprovincial travel (i.e. delivering dogs to PEI or NS), but residents are required to follow the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolation for 14 days upon their return to New Brunswick. Please note that commercial transportation across interprovincial borders is permitted and drivers are not required to self-isolate upon return.

If the service provider is looking to cross the international border from Maine into New Brunswick, they will be subject to the federal Quarantine Act and all the provisions of that Act. 

Businesses and non-profit organizations must follow the control measures and directives of Public Health and WorkSafeNB. It is important for these settings to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 amongst employees, volunteers and the public. 

This includes the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene, and pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each organization to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishments and operations including the provision of transportation.