Information on how New Brunswick will achieve the new normal

  

 

The COVID-19 state of emergency and you

Government has taken measures to protect the health and wellbeing of New Brunswickers during the COVID-19 pandemic. That has led to a State of Emergency and an emergency order restricting many ordinary activities during these extraordinary times.

The Mandatory Order includes rules and conditions aimed at reducing the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Everyone, including individuals, employers and businesses, must follow the order to ensure public health.

While a number of businesses are required to close, all businesses required to cease admitting patrons are permitted to sell online or over the phone and arrange delivery or pick-up of purchases. Door-to-door soliciting is prohibited but delivery is permitted.

 


 

New Brunswick’s COVID-19 and economic recovery road map

Government has introduced a phased recovery plan to ensure that businesses and organizations can resume their activities in a rapid yet safe manner. Progress across all phases will be monitored closely to ensure the health and safety of citizens and to limit the resurgence of COVID-19 transmission within the province.

Throughout all the phases, as we progress towards a “new normal” for New Brunswick, it is critical that everyone adhere to public health measures and restrictions to help protect our communities and loved ones.

 


 

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Current public health alert level

Last updated: May 28, 2020
   

Zone 5 (Campbellton region) is currently in the Orange level.

Zone 5 extends from Whites Brook to the Village of Belledune, including Tide Head, Atholville, Campbellton, Dalhousie, Eel River Dundee, Eel River Bar First Nation, Balmoral, Charlo and Belledune.

The following rules apply to Zone 5 only:

  • A two-household bubble is permitted. Your household can join up with one other household, if both households mutually agree. You must not have close contact with anyone else. You cannot join up with more than one household or bubble.
  • Non-regulated health professionals and businesses such as acupuncturists and naturopaths cannot operate at this time.
  • Personal services businesses such as barbers, hair stylists, spas, estheticians, manicurists, pedicurists, and tattoo artists cannot operate at this time.

All other zones in New Brunswick are moving to the Yellow level. During this time, Public Health measures and guidelines must still be followed.

The following are now allowed:

  • Your household bubble can be extended to close friends and family.
  • Non-regulated health professionals and businesses can open, including acupuncturists and naturopaths.
  • Personal services businesses can open, including: barbers, hair stylists, spas, estheticians, manicurists, pedicurists, and tattoo artists.

On Friday, June 5, 2020, New Brunswick zones, except Zone 5, will loosen additional restrictions under the Yellow level. At that time, the following will be allowed:  

  • Outdoor gatherings of 50 people or fewer with physical distancing. Religious services of 50 people or fewer can take place indoors with physical distancing.
  • Elective surgeries and other non-emergency health-care services will increase.
  • Low-contact team sports can be played.
  • The following will be allowed to open:
    • Swimming pools, saunas and waterparks
    • Gyms, yoga and dance studios
    • Rinks and indoor recreational facilities
    • Pool halls and bowling alleys

On Friday, June 19, 2020, overnight camps will be able to open.

All unnecessary travel into New Brunswick is prohibited. Everyone entering New Brunswick at any point of entry, including airports, must stop when instructed to do so by a peace officer and answer any questions as required to support the intent of the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health. With few exceptions, anyone who comes to New Brunswick from outside the province and remains here is required to self-isolate for 14 days. Information for international and interprovincial travellers can be found here.

 


 

Public Health phases and triggers

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The public health phases mean people can see and plan for the kinds of restrictions that may be required to be put in place to protect New Brunswickers from COVID-19. This includes limiting human contact, as well as travel and business operations.  

The alert levels tell us all what public health measures need to be taken. Until there is a vaccine, community public health measures should be followed to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

The phased plan will allow health experts to monitor and evaluate the impact of the lifting of restrictions. At any time, restrictions that have been lifted may quickly be reinstated to protect public health. Restrictions may be put in place based on provincial, regional or local circumstances such as unlinked community outbreaks or cases that cannot be traced.

 


 


Red level

 

Strict controls to flatten the curve and contain the virus as quickly as possible.

Available services are limited to those that are essential, with mandatory public health measures in place such as physical distancing, business closures and travel restrictions.

Conditions:

  • Frequent hand washing, surface cleaning and physical distancing (2m)
  • Community face masks (facial coverings) in public when physical distancing cannot be maintained (required)
  • No social gatherings
  • Health screenings, handwashing stations, barriers, and reduced maximum occupancies required for public spaces
  • Only businesses or activities deemed essential that can ensure physical distancing are open (with strict controls)
  • Visitations of vulnerable populations (with strict controls)
  • Daycares available for essential workers
  • Schools and post-secondary institutions available virtually

 


 


Orange level

 

Balancing the reopening of businesses and activities while preventing a resurgence of transmission.

Subject to the Public Health and WorkSafeNB COVID-19 general guidance, the following activities are allowed:

  • Elective surgeries and other non-emergency health services
  • Two-household bubble
  • Gatherings with physical distancing of 10 or fewer
  • Golf courses, outdoor tennis courts, marinas
  • Carpooling
  • Outdoor religious services
  • Recreational fishing and hunting
  • Post-secondary education and some cultural venues
  • Offices
  • Retail businesses
  • Restaurants
  • Campgrounds and outdoor recreational activities
  • Daycare, childcare and day camps
  • ATV trails

 

Elective surgeries and other non-emergency health services
Regional health authorities will be restarting non-emergency surgeries, diagnostic procedures and health services. This will be done in a progressive manner to ensure safety of patients and staff.

Health care businesses with services provided by regulated health professionals are now allowed to provide non-emergency health services in-person and shall comply with additional guidance specific to their profession provided by their regulating body. Whenever possible, virtual services should continue to be used.

These include the following: audiologists, cardiology technologists, chiropractors, dental hygienists, dental technicians,  dentists, denturists, dieticians, licensed counselling therapists, licensed practical nurses, massage therapists, medical laboratory technologists, medical radiation technologists, midwives, nurse practitioners, nurses, occupational therapists, opticians, optometrists, paramedics, pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, physicians, physician assistants, physiotherapists, podiatrists, psychologists, respiratory therapists, social workers and speech language pathologists.
 

Two-household bubble
In an effort to reduce social isolation, your household can join up with one other household, if both households mutually agree. You must not have close contact with anyone else. You cannot join up with more than one household or bubble. 


Gatherings with social distancing of 10 or fewer
Outdoor public gatherings with social distancing of 10 or fewer are now allowed. Indoor public gatherings are now possible for small in-person religious services, weddings and funerals to take place. 
  

Golf courses, outdoor tennis courts, marinas
Golf courses, outdoor tennis courts and marinas can operate as long as they follow the Public Health measures as well as respect Public Health and WorkSafe NB guidance and regulations.

Carpooling
Co-workers or neighbours can carpool with passengers from one other household outside their two-household bubble if physical distancing measures can be maintained. Passenger(s) should be transported in the backseat only. Drivers should screen potential passengers for symptoms of COVID-19 and disinfect all surfaces that may have been touched by the passenger(s) daily.
 

Outdoor religious services
As an alternative to online worship, religious organizations can hold outdoor services if the congregation stays in their vehicles and if the vehicles are two metres apart. 
 

Recreational fishing and hunting
The delay on spring seasons has been lifted. Recreational fishing and hunting can take place while respecting physical distancing and other Public Health measures.

Post-secondary institutions and some cultural venues
Post-secondary institutions may now open all in-person programs subject to the COVID-19 general guidance including physical distancing measures. Virtual education whenever possible should continue to be used for programs where possible.

Cultural venues such as museums, galleries and libraries may also open if the organization can respect physical distancing measures, except for brief exchanges where it cannot be avoided. They will also be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance.
 

Offices
All other offices, both client facing and non-client facing businesses not deemed essential during the initial phase can now open subject to the COVID-19 general guidance including physical distancing measures.
 

Retail businesses
Malls and retail businesses, such as clothing and shoe stores, jewellers, tailors, flower shops, sporting good/adventure stores, car dealers, boat dealers, ATV and snowmobile dealers, gift, book and stationery stores, jewelry and accessory stores, toy stores, music, electronic and entertainment stores, pawn shops and similar businesses may reopen subject to the COVID-19 general guidance including physical distancing measures.
 

Restaurants
Restaurants and other similar venues, such as brewpubs and taprooms, may open if they can respect physical distancing measures except for brief exchanges when they cannot be avoided. They will also be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance.
 

Campgrounds and outdoor recreational activities 
Campgrounds, outdoor recreational businesses or operations (i.e. zoos, horse riding, zipline courses, etc.) may open if the organization can respect physical distancing measures, except for brief exchanges where it cannot be avoided. They will also be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance. Water parks and swimming pools are not included in this phase.
 

Daycare, childcare and day camps
Early learning and childcare centres regulated by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development will only be permitted to reopen as of May 19, 2020. Non-regulated childcare providers can open as of May 8, 2020 but must adhere to Public Health guidelines, including having an operational plan.

The opening of these settings will be done in a progressive manner in collaboration with the department. 

Daycare, childcare and day camp organizations must adhere to public health measures set out in the document called COVID-19 Recovery Phase: Guidance to Early Learning and Childcare Facilities and Day Camps.  
  

ATV trails
ATV trails may open across the province. Drivers and passengers will be required to continue to respect community public health measures including those related to limiting gatherings with physical distancing to 10 or fewer during this phase.

 


 


Yellow level


Reopening of more businesses and activities after the ability to control transmission has been demonstrated.

Subject to the Public Health and WorkSafeNB COVID-19 general guidance, the following activities are allowed:

  • Family and friends bubble (May 22)
  • Non-regulated health professionals/businesses (May 22)
  • Personal services businesses (May 22)
  • Outdoor gatherings with physical distancing of 50 or fewer (June 5)
  • Religious services, weddings and funerals of 50 or fewer (June 5)
  • Increase in elective surgeries and other non-emergency health care services (June 5)
  • Swimming pools, saunas and waterparks (June 5)
  • Gyms, yoga and dance studios (June 5)
  • Rinks and indoor recreational facilities (June 5)
  • Pool halls and bowling alleys (June 5)
  • Low-contact team sports (June 5)
  • Overnight camps (June 19) 
  • Other sectors to be determined

 

Family and friends bubble
Your household bubble can be extended to close friends and family. It is recommended that gatherings indoors be limited to no more than 10 people. Continue to keep gatherings as small as possible, especially if you have a vulnerable person in your family or have a child that attends daycare. Large gatherings are discouraged.  
  

Non-regulated health professionals/businesses
Non-regulated health professionals will be allowed to resume in-person services if they can respect physical distancing measures. They will be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance.
  

Personal services businesses
Personal services businesses (i.e. barbers, hair stylists, spas, estheticians, manicurists, pedicurist, tattoo artists etc.) will be allowed to resume in-person services if they can respect physical distancing measures. They will be subject to Public Health and WorkSafe NB general guidance.
  

Outdoor gatherings with physical distancing of 50 or fewer
Outdoor public gatherings with physical distancing of 50 or fewer will be allowed on June 5, 2020. The limit on gatherings will be reviewed on a regular basis according to risk based on the evolution of the situation in New Brunswick.
  

Religious services, weddings and funerals with physical distancing of 50 or fewer
Larger religious services, weddings and funerals of 50 people or fewer can begin taking place (outdoors or indoors) on June 5, 2020 as long as physical distancing can be maintained.
  

Increase in elective surgeries and other non-emergency healthcare services
Regional Health Authorities will increase service levels and occupancy within hospitals and clinics in the province. This will be done in a progressive manner to continue to ensure safety of patients and staff.
  

Swimming pools, saunas, waterparks
Swimming pools, saunas, waterparks and other similar venues may open if they can respect physical distancing measures. They will also be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance.
  

Gyms, yoga, gymnastics, and dance studios
Gyms, yoga, gymnastics, dance studios and other similar venues may open if they can respect physical distancing measures. They will also be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance.
  

Rinks and indoor recreational facilities
Rinks, indoor recreational facilities (i.e. climbing walls, escape rooms) and other similar venues may open if they can respect physical distancing measures. They will also be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance.
  

Pool halls and bowling alleys
Pool halls and bowling alleys may open if they can respect physical distancing measures and sanitization practices for their equipment. They will also be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance.
  

Low-contact team sports
Low-contact team sports activities may operate as per the guidance provided to them by their national or provincial organization, as long as they identify means to limit the number and intensity of close contacts during play. Even low-contact sports have some form of contact and that risk cannot be eliminated entirely. All provincial, regional or local leagues shall maintain operational plans to ensure compliance with this guidance. They will also be subject to the COVID-19 general guidance.

All reasonable attempts shall be made to respect physical distancing measures as much as possible except brief contacts on or off the field, arenas, gyms, rinks, etc. Avoiding contact should also be ensured at the end of a game (e.g. replace handshake with alternative at the end of a game). Youth leagues will ensure that spectators at games are limited to one accompanying adult per child. 
  

Overnight camps
Overnight camps can open as of June 19, 2020 but must adhere to Public Health guidelines, including having an operational plan. Camp organizations must adhere to public health measures set out in the document called COVID-19 Recovery Phase: Guidance to Early Learning and Childcare Facilities and Day Camps.  
  

Other sectors to be determined
The reopening of casinos, amusement centres, bingo halls, arcades and cinemas, bars (without seating), large live performance venues, and large public gatherings will be determined at a later date when additional evidence is available on the continued success of the province in managing a resurgence of the virus.

 


 


Green level

 

After a vaccine is available or more is learned about how to protect people from the virus.

This transition to a new normal includes the reopening of all businesses and activities, with increased health and safety practices remaining part of daily life. All conditions are lifted with the exception of community face masks (facial coverings), which remain required to wear in public when ill.

 


 

Frequently asked questions

 

Prevention and protection:

Community face masks must be worn in public when you are unable to maintain physical distancing.

For information on how to properly put on and take off your mask, visit our fact sheet here.

Individuals who can’t find or buy a mask may use a cloth community masks that require no sewing which can be made from common materials such as a cotton bandanas or T-shirts and using elastics/rubber bands/string/cloth strips, or hair ties to secure it. Sew and no-sew instructions can be found here.

While in a group of 10 or fewer you must follow the public health measures of physical distancing, proper hand hygiene, respiratory etiquette and frequent cleaning of surfaces.

As an additional practice to protect others around you, non-medical masks, also referred to as community face masks, must be worn when out in the community and unable to maintain physical distancing.

These community face masks are not a substitute for physical distancing.

This recommendation does not apply to individuals who cannot do so due to health issues or for children under two years of age.

While diseases can make anyone sick, some individuals are more at risk of developing severe complications from an illness due to underlying medical conditions and age. If you are at risk for complications, you can take action to reduce your risk of getting sick from COVID-19.

People who identify with the following should act in an abundance of caution when out in the community.

  • People with medical conditions including:
    • Heart disease
    • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
    • Lung disease
    • Diabetes
    • Cancer
  • People with weakened immune systems from a medical condition or treatment, such as chemotherapy
  • Older adults

Public Health recommends the following to help you reduce your risk of contracting COVID-19:

  • If possible, only leave your home when it is absolutely necessary. Try to find safe alternatives for accessing the goods or services you need.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • If contact cannot be avoided, take the following precautions:
    • Keep at least two metres between yourself and the other person
    • Give a friendly wave instead of a handshake
    • Keep interactions brief
    • Follow the public health measures required by the businesses you are visiting
    • Clean hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, if not available, use alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
    • Carry alcohol-based hand sanitizer when you are outside of your home.
    • Avoid touching your mouth, nose, and eyes and/or food with your hands.
    • Avoid touching high-touch surfaces such as doorknobs, handrails and elevator buttons in public places.
    • If you need to touch surfaces in public places, use a tissue or your sleeve to cover your hand.
    • Avoid crowds and public gatherings.

Public Health will continue testing New Brunswickers for COVID-19 during all phases of our recovery. Anyone exhibiting two or more of the following symptoms (even if mild) should immediately self-isolate and call Tele-Care 8-1-1 for further direction.

  • fever above 38 degrees Celsius,
  • a new cough, or worsening chronic cough,
  • sore throat,
  • runny nose,
  • headache,
  • a new onset of fatigue,
  • a new onset of muscle pain,
  • diarrhea,
  • loss of sense of taste,
  • loss of sense of smell, and
  • in children, purple markings on the fingers and toes
  • difficulty breathing
  • pneumonia

You can expect more aggressive random testing to occur in the weeks ahead.

 

General advice:

Your household bubble can be extended to close friends and family. It is recommended that gatherings indoors be limited to no more than 10 people. Continue to keep gatherings as small as possible, especially if you have a vulnerable person in your family or have a child that attends daycare. Large gatherings are discouraged.

Close friends are those you consider as part of your regular social circle.

Yes, however newborns are not fully immunized so caution should always be taken to protect them. This includes all the same measures we use for COVID-19, wash your hands, respiratory etiquette and staying away if sick.

If any member of the group has chronic health conditions or is unhealthy that would put the newborn at greater risk.

You should always be aware of who you have been in contact with over the past two weeks. These are the people who would need to be contacted by public health if you were to test positive for COVID-19.

It is recommended that gatherings indoors be limited to no more than 10 people. Continue to keep gatherings as small as possible, especially if you have a vulnerable person in your family or have a child that attends daycare. Large gatherings are discouraged.

As per public health guidance, New Brunswickers are asked to only group together if proper public health measures can be followed. Such as:

  • Physical distancing (saying hello and socializing from a distance; avoid hand shaking or hugs)
  • Proper hand hygiene
  • Respiratory etiquette (cover your cough with tissues or your sleeve)
  • Frequent cleaning of surfaces

If you or someone in your group is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, please remain home and call Tele-Care 8-1-1 for further direction. if any member of the group has chronic health conditions that would put them at greater risk, or if they are in close contact with someone who could be vulnerable.

As most adult day centres are located in nursing homes, their openings will be delayed due to the high risk associated with these facilities. The Department of Social Development will continue to coordinate with Public Health moving forward to determine when centres can open.

It is important to note that respite services in the home remain as an ongoing service in the province. New Brunswickers with family members who would normally attend an adult day centre are encouraged to reach out to their social worker to access these services.

The Department of Social Development is coordinating with Public Health to determine when facilities can safely open. In the meantime, there are many ways to virtually connect with your loved ones in long term care facilities.

Palliative patients are permitted to select two visitors to comfort and support them. The two individuals selected will be the only visitors permitted, and only one visitor is permitted at a time.

If a visitor requires a support person to visit (e.g. frail elderly spouse or individual with a disability), this person counts as the second chosen visitor. In exceptional cases, the support person can visit at the same time while respecting physical distancing in the facility. There can be no change in the two visitors chosen.

No. The only exception will be in palliative care and pediatrics, those patients are permitted two visitors per patients.

Regional Health Authorities will be restarting non-emergency surgeries, diagnostic procedures and health services. This will be done in a progressive manner to ensure the safety of patients and staff.

Patients will be notified and scheduled for a screening appointment, where they will be tested for COVID-19. Immediately following the test, patients will be directed to self-isolate for three days before their scheduled surgery.

Large gatherings such as festivals, fairs and concerts are prohibited through Dec. 31, 2020, subject to change.

The State of Emergency declaration indicates all licenses, registrations, certificates and permits issued by the Province of New Brunswick valid as of March 16th, 2020 shall remain valid until June 30th, 2020 unless suspended by a court or by other authority under an Act of the Province. This includes inspection stickers. However, if the station and the client choose to do an inspection anyway, the supplies must be on hand to do so. No inspection should be performed if the station does not have the stickers on hand. Inspection stickers will be provided to stations to ensure they have the necessary supplies.

The use of community centres is not prohibited by the Mandatory Order COVID-19 as long as the ability to use them is in a manner that ensures you can maintain a distance of at least 2 metres from others. This would apply to all activities, programming and services provided by the centre. 

All are reminded to observe the directives and advice contained in the Order and provided by the Chief Medical Officer of Health and WorkSafeNB. This includes the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each organization to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishment. 

If owners or operators are unable to operate within the Order then they must not open their premises during the state of emergency. 

The safe operation of the bus service, including the determination of capacity, will be determined through the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan based on advice and guidance from Public Health and WorkSafeNB. Municipalities are encouraged to contact WorkSafeNB for assistance in its development. 

The Operational Plan will address elements such as physical distancing, including an appropriate number of patrons on the bus; cleaning and disinfecting; hand and respiratory hygiene; and pre-screening for symptoms. It is important to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 amongst employees, patrons and the public. 

Please note that rules on gatherings only applies to owners and occupiers of land (outdoor gatherings) or owners and occupiers of buildings (indoor gatherings).

Entry into Canada falls under federal jurisdiction and any inquiries regarding the conveyance of animals should be made to the Government of Canada. Please note that the Canada Border Services Agency has instituted a COVID-19 hotline related to cross-border travel and COVID-19 at 1-800-461-9999 or consult Border Information Service.

Regarding travel within Canada, it is important to note that people crossing interprovincial borders can bring significant health risks to New Brunswick. The Mandatory Order prohibits all unnecessary travel into the province, including to make purchases, to visit or for other social purposes. Entering New Brunswick for the purpose of adopting a pet is not permitted at this time.  

If New Brunswick volunteers deliver the animals to Nova Scotia or PEI, the Mandatory Order permits re-entry into New Brunswick, but residents are required to follow the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolation for 14 days upon their return. However, mandatory isolation could be avoided by utilizing commercial transport (e.g. hiring a commercial driver to deliver the animals).

Travel within New Brunswick is permitted provided that the organization follows the directives of the Order regarding physical distancing, preventing gatherings and the specific responsibilities of business owners/service providers. 

Businesses and non-profit organizations must also follow the control measures and directives of Public Health and WorkSafeNB. It is important for these settings to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 amongst employees, volunteers and the public. 

This includes the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene, and pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each organization to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishments and operations, including the provision of transportation. 

Please be aware that all provinces have their own travel restrictions; therefore, it is advised that individuals check with those provinces before travelling. 

 

Workers and business:

Public Health and WorkSafeNB have created guidance documents and templates to help support businesses preparing to re-open. Businesses that meet the requirements, must have a copy of their COVID-19 Operational Plan Guide on site as a Public Health Inspector, WorkSafeNB or representative from the Department of Public Safety may show up unannounced and request to see it.

Yes, please visit our resource page on the GNB COVID-19 website.

No temporary foreign worker is permitted to enter New Brunswick to work in the province. This does not affect the status of temporary foreign workers already in Canada as of April 28, 2020. It also does not affect anyone who has a work permit issued in relation to a nomination of permanent residence through the New Brunswick Provincial Nominee or the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program.

 

Our WorkingNB services recently reopened to provide virtual support to NB job-seekers and employers. Staff are now available to any New Brunswick employer or job-seeker looking for support over the phone and through virtual services online. Explore the WorkingNB Virtual Career Fair May 12-13.

As part of those virtual services, JobMatchNB has been launched to connect employers with job-seekers. This will help to address the job shortage in key sectors including fisheries and agriculture as a result of Temporary Foreign Workers not able to cross the border and work here this season. We need New Brunswickers to fill these positions. By stepping up, you’ll be helping your community and our province’s economy.

NBJobs.ca is also updated daily and many opportunities are available.

There are many jobs available in fisheries and agriculture. Visit JobMatchNB to explore those opportunities and explore the WorkingNB Virtual Career Fair May 12-13. NBJobs.ca is also updated daily and many opportunities are available. You can also contact WorkingNB for support.

We are working closely with universities to find solutions as quickly as we can in identifying employers who are still able to offer students opportunities, such as connecting them with newly designed virtual employment opportunities.

We are also working closely with regional WorkingNB offices in partnership with ONB to identify key industry sectors that are deemed essential or critical and are able to offer employment opportunities even while managing the COVID 19 situation. We encourage all students to keep checking www.NBJOBS.ca website as postings are updated daily. In addition, SEED jobs are posted online at nbjobs.ca and students can explore the WorkingNB Virtual Career Fair May 12-13.

The federal government also has supports in place for post-secondary students. Students may be eligible for the new Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). Eligibility should be confirmed with the Government of Canada.

Students may also be eligible for the Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB) which provides $1,250 a month from May through August. College and university students currently in school, planning to start in September, or who graduated in December 2019 may be eligible. Working students earning less than $1,000 per month will be able to apply.

A list of provincial and federal supports are available online.

Order number 20 of the Emergency Measures Act reads as follows: 

No landlord shall, in relation to any commercial and any other type of non-residential lease, whether written or verbal, give any tenant any sort of notice to quit, re-enter or re-possess demised premises, or exercise any right of distress, until May 31, 2020, for non-payment of rent that came due after March 19, 2020.

Businesses can still be evicted but the reason for the eviction cannot be that they are unable to pay their rent due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All other tenant obligations remain. 

If a business is unable to pay rent, they must discuss the matter with their landlord and make the appropriate arrangements for payment. 

Farmers markets are permitted to reopen if they can enforce physical distancing measures and other recommendations of the chief medical officer of health.

Farmers markets are an essential part of our food-supply chain, and we appreciate the work they are doing to provide local, safe and healthy food to New Brunswickers in these difficult times.

Farmers markets need to develop an overall COVID-19 Operation Plan. In addition, each vendor must develop an individual operational plan. More information on how to establish these operational plans is available online.

The Mandatory Order COVID-19 now allows public-facing businesses to admit patrons, provided that they comply with the provisions of the Order and advice to minimize risk issued by the Chief Medical Officer of Health and WorkSafeNB. All businesses must take every reasonable step to:

  • ensure minimal interaction of people within 2 metres of each other;
  • prevent persons who exhibit symptoms of COVID-19 from entering the workplace; and
  • prevent persons from entering workplaces who have travelled outside New Brunswick in the previous 14 days. 

Please note that under the Mandatory Order, swimming pools, spas, saunas, waterparks, gymnasia, yoga studios, dance studios, rinks and arenas, climbing walls, escape rooms, arcades, amusement centers, pool halls, bowling alleys, casinos, cinemas, aquaria, and theatres and other live performance venues, are prohibited from admitting patrons, as are barbers, hair stylists, and esthetics service providers. If any of these facilities or services are available on the premises, they must remain closed to all patrons.

Owners and occupiers of any land or building must also take all reasonable steps to prevent outdoor gatherings of more than 10 persons and indoor gatherings of any number, with the exception of marriage ceremonies, funerals and religious services with up to 10 attendees. Persons are not deemed to be “gathering” when they perform work duties or attend at places of business, simply by virtue of the fact than 10 or more are at the same place at the same time. A gathering implies intent or purpose associated with socializing or entertainment. 

Every business is also required to establish a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each institution to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishment. 

 

The revised Mandatory Order allows businesses/private training companies to resume activities. However, virtual education options should be continued wherever possible.

Businesses/private training companies admitting patrons must follow the control measures and directives of Public Health and WorkSafeNB. It is important for these settings to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 amongst employees, patrons and the public. 

This includes the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene, and pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each business/private training company to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishment. 

As the driving component of the training is an extension of the workplace, it is also subject to the requirements of the Operational Plan and advice of WorkSafeNB. This includes wearing protective equipment when workplaces cannot ensure minimal interaction of people within two metres of each other.

If the animals have already arrived in New Brunswick, travel within the province is permitted provided that the service provider follows the directives of the Mandatory Order regarding physical distancing, preventing gatherings and the specific responsibilities of business owners/service providers.

The Mandatory Order permits re-entry into the province following interprovincial travel (i.e. delivering dogs to PEI or NS), but residents are required to follow the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolation for 14 days upon their return to New Brunswick. Please note that commercial transportation across interprovincial borders is permitted and drivers are not required to self-isolate upon return.

If the service provider is looking to cross the international border from Maine into New Brunswick, they will be subject to the federal Quarantine Act and all the provisions of that Act. 

Businesses and non-profit organizations must follow the control measures and directives of Public Health and WorkSafeNB. It is important for these settings to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 amongst employees, volunteers and the public. 

This includes the establishment of a COVID-19 Operational Plan that addresses, but is not limited to, physical distancing, cleaning and disinfecting, hand and respiratory hygiene, and pre-screening for symptoms. It is the responsibility of each organization to ensure they have a plan in place that outlines how they will manage the safe operation of their establishments and operations including the provision of transportation.