Government of New Brunswick
fiddleheadFiddleheads are a New Brunswick delicacy.
  • Partridge Island was used as a quarantine / immigration station and is also the site of the world’s first steam-operated fog horn.
  • An arboretum of all tree species native to New Brunswick is found in Odell Park in Fredericton, the provincial capital.
  • Near Saint-Jacques, one of the few remaining RAF Lancaster Bombers is on display.
  • On the furthest tip of Miscou Island, a lighthouse in operation since 1856 continues to serve as a major navigational beacon.
  • One of the longest natural sandbars in the world is at Eel River Bar. On one side of the bar there is salt water, and on the other side, fresh water.
  • At Rogersville, a monument pays tribute to Acadian settlers and has been the home of a Trappist Monastery since 1904.
  • The Enclosure Provincial Park is the site of an exciting archaeological excavation where Aboriginal, Scottish, Acadian and Loyalist settlements have been uncovered.
  • At Boiestown, the Central New Brunswick Woodmen’s Museum chronicles the fascinating history of people who worked in the woods.
  • One of the most popular and most photographed attractions in Eastern Canada are the flowerpot rocks at Hopewell Cape. This is one of the best locations to view the rise and fall of the Fundy tides.
  • Shediac, lobster capital of the world and site of an annual lobster festival, also has the world’s largest lobster.
  • Canadian Forces Base Gagetown, located in Oromocto, is the largest military training area in the British Commonwealth. A military museum is open to the public
  • The Old Sow, off Deer Island, is one of the largest whirlpools. It can best be seen three hours before high tide.
  • The highest and longest trestle bridge in Eastern Canada can be seen near New Denmark.
  • Hartland is the site of the longest wooden covered bridge in the world. The structure, built in 1899, stretches for 391 metres across the St. John River.
  • The St. John River system is the second largest on North America’s Atlantic coastline.
  • Fiddleheads, edible, tightly coiled ferns that resemble the spiral end of a violin or fiddle, are a New Brunswick delicacy.
  • New Brunswick has more than 48 lighthouses and is famous for its existing inland lighthouse system that dots its inland rivers.
  • New Brunswick has 62 remaining covered bridges. Kings County is considered the Covered Bridge Capital of Atlantic Canada. The bridges that are standing today are living examples of the pride of craftsmanship, heritage, engineering and design of our forefathers. The ‘’Longest Covered Bridge in the World’’ is located in Hartland, New Brunswick - 390 m (1,282 ft.) long.
  • Charles Thomas "Stompin' Tom" Connors, one of Canada's most prolific and well-known folk singers, was born in Saint John on February 9, 1936.
  • The world’s oldest intact shark fossil, over 409-million years old, was discovered near Atholville, in the heart of the Appalachian Range.
  • New Brunswick’s Sir Charles G.D. Roberts was the first Canadian poet to be knighted.
  • The first French settlement in North America was attempted in 1604 on Saint Croix Island.
  • The University of New Brunswick is tied with the University of Georgia as being the oldest University in North America.
  • The oldest “still in use” university building in Canada is the Old Arts Building, located on the Fredericton Campus of the University of New Brunswick.
  • Fredericton’s Willie O’Ree was the first black player in the NHL.


New Brunswick Inventions

  • Scuba tank, James Elliot and Alexander McAvity, Saint John, 1839.
  • Compound steam engine, Benjamin F. Tibbets, Fredericton, 1845.
  • Snow blower, Robert Carr Harris, Dalhousie, 1870.
  • Sardine cans, Henry T. Austin, Black’s Harbour, 1932.
  • Clothes washer with roller wringer, John E. Turnbull, Saint John, 1843.
  • Combined hot and cold water faucets, Thomas Campbell, Saint John, 1880.
  • Crossword game, Edward R. MacDonald, Shediac, 1926.
  • Dump-box for trucks, Robert T. Mawhinney, Saint John, 1920.
  • Ganong Brothers Ltd., St. Stephen, are the first in Canada to produce lollipops (1895), to use cellophane packaging (1920), to make peppermint rolls (1926), and to sell Valentine candy in heart-shaped boxes (1932).