Government of New Brunswick
  • Make your child’s world smoke-free!  The best way to protect your family from second-hand smoke at home is not to allow the use of any tobacco products, such as smoking of cigarettes, cigars or pipes in your home or car.
  • Choose a non-smoking child care centre.
  • Help your child understand the short term effects of smoking: cigarettes smell bad, and they stain teeth, clothes and fingers. They also make it harder to participate in sports.
  • Teach your child how cigarette advertisements paint a false picture that smoking is glamorous.
  • If your child has not smoked yet, praise her or him.
  • Help your child learn to say "no" to smoking and still feel good about himself or herself. Work with your child to help them practice how to say no.
  • You will find that as your child grows, your conversations about tobacco will change and reflect their growing maturity, intellectual abilities and the pressures they face. Talking about tobacco can help set the stage for important discussions about alcohol, drugs and other risky behaviours.
  • Take advantage of opportunities to let your child know about the harmful effects of tobacco. For example, if your preschooler is washing their hands, you might say: "There are lots of things we do to keep our bodies healthy and clean, like washing our hands or brushing our teeth. But there are also things that are bad for us. Smoking cigarettes is one of these. It makes your breath smell bad and makes it hard to breathe."
  • If your child is interested in a particular subject such as ballet or hockey, bring that subject into the conversation in a meaningful way that shows them how smoking relates to their interest. For example: "Hockey players don't smoke because it will make it hard for them to breathe when they play."
  • When you see someone smoking in a movie or on TV, start a discussion about how cigarettes are used in the movie to make an actor look rebellious or cool. Point out that in reality, cigarettes actually cause wrinkles, turn your teeth yellow and make you smell bad.
  • Talk to your child about peer pressure. Ask if him/her knows what peer pressure is and if he/she has ever felt pushed by his/her friends to do something he/she didn't want to do. By defining and discussing peer pressure, you will help prepare them to deal with it.
  • Quit smoking yourself.  By quitting now, you can have a positive influence on your child's future decision not to smoke. Studies have shown that
  • children who observe their parents quitting are less likely to smoke
  • themselves.
  • If you are unable to quit, it is important that you help your child understand that it is very difficult for you to quit and that you know it is bad for your health. Do everything you can to avoid smoking around your child.