Government of New Brunswick
 

Zika Virus

Zika infection is caused by a virus which is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito.  The virus does not spread from person to person; it is not like the flu.  Most infections do not cause any symptoms.  When present, the most common symptoms are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). Other common symptoms include muscle pain and headache.

Zika virus has been reported in Africa and parts of Asia since the 1950s, and in the southwestern Pacific Ocean in 2007. In 2015, Zika virus emerged in South America with widespread outbreaks reported in Brazil and Colombia. Travellers to countries where the Zika virus is actively circulating, particularly pregnant women or those considering becoming pregnant, should protect themselves from mosquito bites. Mosquitoes known to transmit the virus to humans are not present in Canada.

Provincial Public Health officials are working closely with the Public Health Agency of Canada and their counterparts in other Canadian jurisdictions to monitor the situation and to detect and manage any cases in Canada should they occur.

 

Ebola Virus

Ebola virus causes severe disease that is often fatal. Initial symptoms include fever, chills, headache and joint and muscle aches. The Ebola virus does not spread easily from person to person; it is not like the flu. It is spread through direct contact with blood, body fluids or tissues of infected persons or infected animals and medical equipment that is infected with body fluids.

Since 1976 Ebola viruses have been found in several African countries. A large outbreak of Ebola is currently occurring in West Africa.  At the present time there have been no confirmed cases of Ebola in Canada and the risk to Canadians remains very low. Healthcare workers and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with infected blood or body fluids, however the risk can be lowered through use of infection control measures.

 

Avian Influenza A (H7N9)

Influenza A(H7N9) is a new strain of influenza virus that has been causing severe illness in people in China. The virus is thought to have originated in birds. No cases have been reported in Canada and this particular strain of H7N9 flu virus has not been detected in birds in Canada, which means the risk to Canadians of catching this virus is presently considered to be low. Provincial Public Health officials are working closely with their counterparts in other Canadian jurisdictions to monitor the situation and to detect and manage any cases in Canada should they occur.

 

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

Coronaviruses are common and have symptoms that range from mild illness to more severe disease. In 2012 a new severe strain of coronavirus emerged in the Middle-East called the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). The number of cases of MERS-CoV has increased recently with cases appearing in many Middle-East countries, Europe, and the United States. At the present time the risk to New Brunswickers is considered low. Provincial Public Health officials are working closely with their counterparts in other Canadian jurisdictions to monitor the situation and to detect and manage any cases in Canada should they occur.