Government of New Brunswick

Q: Is forest harvesting allowed in Protected Natural Areas?
A: No, forest harvesting of any kind is prohibited in Protected Natural Areas.
 

Q: Am I able to get a fuel wood /road side permit inside Protected Natural Areas?
A: No, forest harvesting of any kind is prohibited in Protected Natural Areas.
 

Q: What will happen if oil or gas is discovered below a Protected Natural Area’s surface?
A:  Mineral and petroleum extraction is prohibited from Protected Natural Areas. Oil and gas exploration is also prohibited, except by prospectors who held claims before the Protected Natural Areas designation.
 

Q: Are there restrictions on access to private property and camp lot leases within Protected Natural Areas?
A: No, camp owners and private landowners may continue to access their private land and leasehold property as they have in the past. Owners’ and lessee rights will not be affected by the Protected Natural Areas designation.
 

Q: Are private lands included in the new Protected Natural Areas? 
A: Yes, some land trust organisations have approached the government requesting that their land be designated as Protected Natural Area. Private land can only become a Protected Natural Area if the landowners agree in writing to the designation.
 

Q: Are activities on private land adjacent to the Protected Natural Areas affected?
A: Activities outside of Protected Natural Areas are not affected by the Protected Natural Areas Act.
 

Q: Will existing camp lot leases be allowed to continue?
A: Yes, all existing camp lot leases will be honoured, as per the existing Department of Energy and Resource Development Camp Lot Leasing Policy. However, as per the Policy, when an isolated camp lot lease (i.e. not in a designated group or cluster) on Crown land is cancelled, it will not be re-offered.
 

Q: Can camp lot leases within Protected Natural Areas be be renewed once they expire? 
A: Yes. Leaseholders are able to maintain their leases and renew them, as per the existing Department of Energy and Resource Development’s Camp Lot leasing Policy. 
 

Q: Are ATVs and snowmobiles allowed in Protected Natural Areas?
A: ATVs and snowmobiles are allowed on approved trails within Protected Natural Areas. The underlying principle is that only thoroughfares will be approved where needed to connect to managed trails existing outside of the Protected Natural Areas. 
 

Q: Is the maintenance of ATV and snowmobile trails allowed (grooming trails, placement of signs, cutting back overgrowth) in Protected Natural Areas?
A: Yes, the maintenance of leased or licensed trails is allowed under the terms and conditions of the agreements.
 

Q: Is hunting, trapping/snaring and fishing permitted in Protected Natural Areas?
A: Yes, people may continue to hunt, trap/snare and fish in Class II Protected Natural Areas. These activities are regulated by the Fish and Wildlife Act in the same manner as they are outside of the Protected Natural Areas. There are, however, some hunting and fishing restrictions that apply specifically to Protected Natural Areas.
 

Q: Is boating allowed within Protected Natural Areas?
A: The Protected Natural Areas legislation does not place any restrictions on boats in Class II Protected Natural Areas. This activity is subject to the Department of Environment and Local Government’s Clean Water Act.
 

Q: Is camping allowed within Protected Natural Areas?
A: Wilderness tenting is allowed in Class II Protected Natural Areas.  Camping with the use of trailers and recreational vehicles is not allowed. 
 

Q: Are any of the new sites Class I Protected Natural Areas?
A: Yes, there is a new Class I Protected Natural Area south of Perth-Andover that has an exceptionally rich hardwood forest. This site was identified as worthy of protection during the planning stage of the TransCanada Highway and the construction of the highway was rerouted to circumvent it. A Class I designation, which restricts all access except with an Educational or Scientific permit, is only assigned when the plants or wildlife species in the site are deemed too sensitive to sustain disturbance. In total, there are six Class I Protected Natural Areas. New scientific knowledge could support a future decision to designate a site or portion of a site as Class I. Such an area would likely be small.
 

Q: Is scientific research, ecological monitoring and habitat restoration allowed in Protected Natural Areas?
A: These activities are allowed with a permit from the Minister of Energy and Resource Development.